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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 41 5 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 40 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 18 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 16 0 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 14 0 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 12 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 9 1 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 1 9 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 7 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States.. You can also browse the collection for Fort Heiman (Kentucky, United States) or search for Fort Heiman (Kentucky, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 20 results in 2 document sections:

column; while C. F. Smith, with two brigades — some 5,000 or 6,000 men-landed on the left bank, with orders to take the earthwork opposite Fort Henry, known as Fort Heiman. During the debarkation on the 4th three of the gunboats approached the forts and tried the range of their guns, throwing solid shot and nine-inch shells at a nston, received the following letter, written the day before, by the Hon. James E. Saunders: Nashville, January , 17, 1862. dear sir: I am just starting for Fort Heiman, opposite Fort Henry, where I have been for some time. I was sent for ammunition and equipments (which I have obtained), as none of the officers could be sparets would be equivalent to abandoning Fort Henry. The Alabama troops are raw and undisciplined. In my poor opinion, a disciplined regiment should be sent to Fort Heiman, and another or two to Rickman's furnace, half-way between Forts Donelson and Henry, six miles from each, where there is a village of houses to shelter the men.
rigade of Colonel Heiman, about 1,700 strong. Heiman's position, as he himself describes it, was asdown to a ravine, and was heavily timbered. Heiman's brigade was arranged as follows, from right h the oak-woods until it found itself opposite Heiman's position, near the Confederate centre. His day was thirty-nine in killed and wounded. Heiman's position has already been described. A saliuard. While the combined attack was going on, Heiman was to hold his own position with his brigade s for a final assault, hurled Pillow, Buckner, Heiman, the garrison-all-upon the crowded front and fpoint of the fight, Pillow, finding himself at Heiman's position, heard of (or saw) preparations by the Forty-second Tennessee, also came up from Heiman's position, and helped Hanson defend the seconndergo a loss of one-third without a shudder. Heiman's entire brigade, at the least 1,575 strong, to o'clock he drew up the left wing, including Heiman's brigade, for the sally. By 3 A. M. it was p[7 more...]