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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 338 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 193 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 174 4 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 78 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 74 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 64 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 58 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 54 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 38 0 Browse Search
John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 32 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Fort Jackson (Louisiana, United States) or search for Fort Jackson (Louisiana, United States) in all documents.

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San Antonio, and all the other Government works in Texas, which served as the depots of immense stores of arms and ammunition, have been surrendered by the commanders or seized by disloyal hands. Forts Macon, Caswell, Johnson, Clinch, Pulaski, Jackson, Marion, Barrancas, McKee, Morgan, Gaines, Pike, Macomb, St. Phillip, Livingston, Smith, and three at Charleston, Oglethorpe barracks, Barrancas barracks, New Orleans barracks, Fort Jackson, on the Mississippi, the battery at Bienvenue, Dupre, aFort Jackson, on the Mississippi, the battery at Bienvenue, Dupre, and the works at Ship Island, have been successively stolen from the Government or betrayed by their commanding officers. The Custom-Houses at New Orleans, Mobile, Savannah, Charleston, and other important points, containing vast amounts of Government funds, have been treacherously appropriated to sustain the cause of rebellion. In like manner the Branch Mints at New Orleans, at, Charlotte and at Dahlonega, have been illegally seized, in defiance of every principle of common honesty and honor.
oultrie and Castle Pinckney, at Charleston, seized. December 30. The United States arsenal at Charleston seized. January 2. Fort Macon and the United States arsenal at Fayetteville seized by North Carolina. January 3. Forts Pulaski and Jackson, and the United States arsenal at Savannah, seized by Georgia troops. January 4. Fort Morgan and the United States arsenal at Mobile seized by Alabama. January 8. Forts Johnson and Caswell, at Smithville, seized by North Carolina; restoredbearing reinforcements to Major Anderson, fired at in Charleston harbor. January 10. The steamer Marion seized by South Carolina; restored on the 11th. January 11. The United States arsenal at Baton Rouge, and Forts Pike, St. Philip, and Jackson, seized by Louisiana. January 12. Fort Barrancas and the navy-yard at Pensacola seized by Florida. January 12. Fort McRae, at Pensacola, seized by Florida. These forts cost $5,947,000, are pierced for 1,099 guns, and are adapted for a w