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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 338 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 193 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 174 4 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 78 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 74 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 64 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 58 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 54 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 38 0 Browse Search
John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 32 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Fort Jackson (Louisiana, United States) or search for Fort Jackson (Louisiana, United States) in all documents.

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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 3.-attack on the defences of Mobile. (search)
ountering and overcoming the rebel fleet, I had the satisfaction to receive this day. Some preliminary account of your operations had previously reached us through rebel channels. Again it is my pleasure and my duty to congratulate you and your brave associates on an achievement unequalled in our service by any other commander, and only surpassed by that unparalleled naval triumph of the squadron under your command in the spring of 1862, when, proceeding up the Mississippi, you passed Forts Jackson and St. Philip, and, overcoming all obstructions, captured New-Orleans, and restored unobstructed navigation to the commercial emporium of the great central valley of the Union. The Bay of Mobile was not only fortified and guarded by forts and batteries on shore, and by submerged obstructions, but the rebels had also collected there a formidable fleet, commanded by their highest naval officer — a former captain in the Union navy — who, false to the government and the Union, had desert
ined the Brooklyn; was in the actions with Forts Jackson and St. Philip, and with the rebel iron-cl on board the Brooklyn in the actions with Forts Jackson and St. Philip, and with the rebel iron-cl on board the Brooklyn in the actions with Forts Jackson and St. Philip, and the ironclads and gunb in January, 1861; was in the actions with Forts Jackson and St. Philip, and the rebel iron-clads aof the passes of the Mississippi; with the Forts Jackson and St. Philip; the rebel iron-clads and g on board the Westfield in the actions with Fort Jackson and St. Philip; the Chalmettes; and presentHe was in the Brooklyn in the actions with Forts Jackson and St. Philip; the Chalmettes; batteries the head of the passes of the Mississippi; Forts Jackson and St. Philip; the Chalmettes; the rebel the head of the passes of the Mississippi; Forts Jackson and St. Philip; the Chalmettes; the rebel on board the Brooklyn in the actions with Forts Jackson and St. Philip; the Chalmettes; the rebel [16 more...]