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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
their contour in every high wind. There is but to add that the main channel by which ships enter Charleston harbor runs within easy gunshot of Morris Island from one end of it to the other, then crosses to the northward and passes between Fort Moultrie on Sullivan's Island, and Fort Sumter, built upon a shoal about midway between the two islands. From this rapid sketch, reference being had to the map, it will be readily appreciated that from the base held by the enemy, a front attack ups Island nearest to Morris Island. For a time our comrades of the Twelfth and Eighteenth battalions shared this post with us, but as the season progressed we were separated, the Twelfth going to Sumter and other points, and the Eighteenth to Fort Moultrie, where it performed months of arduous and trying service. At Fort Johnson, which, up to that time had possessed no special strength, very heavy works were constructed, having reference not only to the inner harbor, but also to the operatio
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of service in Charleston Harbor in 1863. (search)
emy in the operations that followed. The surface of the island is but little raised above the level of the sea and presents a glaring stretch of white sandy hillocks, which were sparsely dotted with the coarse grasses of the coast, and which changed their contour in every high wind. There is but to add that the main channel by which ships enter Charleston harbor runs within easy gunshot of Morris Island from one end of it to the other, then crosses to the northward and passes between Fort Moultrie on Sullivan's Island, and Fort Sumter, built upon a shoal about midway between the two islands. From this rapid sketch, reference being had to the map, it will be readily appreciated that from the base held by the enemy, a front attack upon Charleston could begin here and nowhere else; and that, as the defences of the inner harbor were at that time imperfect, the immediate fall of Wagner would gravely impair the safety of Charleston also. But that little mound of sand had its histor
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of services in Charleston Harbor. (search)
here can be no doubt, though, that it would have added grave complications to the Confederate military position, to say the least of it. At such time as the First regiment was not on duty at Wagner, it was posted at Fort Johnson, the point of James Island nearest to Morris Island. For a time our comrades of the Twelfth and Eighteenth battalions shared this post with us, but as the season progressed we were separated, the Twelfth going to Sumter and other points, and the Eighteenth to Fort Moultrie, where it performed months of arduous and trying service. At Fort Johnson, which, up to that time had possessed no special strength, very heavy works were constructed, having reference not only to the inner harbor, but also to the operations of the enemy on Morris Inland. These batteries, as well as the others along the shores of James Island, proved very annoying to the enemy, and the accuracy of their fire is mentioned more than once in his reports. A most interesting feature in
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Lee and Scott. (search)
of the Southern States, and especially to those of his dear native State of Virginia. Accompanying this memoir was an official letter addressed to the President of the United States, through the Secretary of War, dated a day or two before the election, and admonishing him of the certainty of Lincoln's success, of the equal certainty of the secession of the Southern States, and the almost equal certainty of their swift seizure of the following forts, in this order, viz.: Fortress Monroe, Fort Moultrie and Fort Pickens. General Scott, therefore, as an official duty, advised the President whence such reinforcements could be drawn from Northern forts as would make a coup de main impossible and a capture by sieges very improbable. These papers General Scott enclosed to Governor Anderson, and, in a private note, requested Governor Anderson to exhibit the paper to General Twiggs and Colonel Lee especially, and to such other officers of the army as he might deem advisable. The paper w