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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 328 328 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 126 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 120 0 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 63 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 62 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 38 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 36 2 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 30 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 30 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 28 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Gaines Mill (Virginia, United States) or search for Gaines Mill (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General T. J. (Stonewall) Jackson, Confederate States army. (search)
splayed, his voice displayed it in battle. It was not the peal of the trumpet, but the sharp crack of the rifle, sudden, imperative, resolute. I venture a word as to the battles in which Jackson's conduct has been criticised. The delay at Gaines' Mill has been the subject of much comment. The truth is that General Lee directed Jackson to place his corps on our extreme left, where he would be joined by the command of D. H. Hill. He ordered him to form in line of battle with Hill and wait until McClellan retreated towards the Pamunkey, and then to strike him a side blow and capture him. For this purpose Jackson had, with Hill's division, 25,500 men. When we arrived at Gaines' Mill, D. H. Hill had engaged the enemy. Jackson, obeying Lee's instructions, sent an aide to inform Hill of the orders of the Commander-in-Chief, and it was with some difficulty that he withdrew him from the fight. It was only when Jackson found that McClellan was not being driven from his works that he pu
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.16 (search)
all had got in their rear, abandoned their position, destroying ammunition, &c., and fell back to a yet stronger line of works. In fact they had three lines of battle here, each protected by breastworks extending from a point on the left near Gaines' Mill, to a point on the right beyond Cold Harbor. In the attack on this position, the division of D. H. Hill—to which the 23d belonged—was the first to become engaged. When the battle became general, and the whole of Jackson's and Longstreet's coas between 150 and 175, officers and privates. Sergeant-Major W. F. Gill, of Granville, was killed at Malvern Hill; Captain Cole, of Co. D, and Lieutenant Munday, of K, were wounded. Adjutant Turner, of Granville, was wounded in the fight at Gaines' Mill, and Captain Young of the same county wounded at Malvern Hill. After Malvern Hill several weeks of quiet were passed near Richmond. No further movement was attempted by McClellan on the Peninsula. The next movement of the Washington gover
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.27 (search)
e wornout soldiers slept on their arms. At early dawn the march was begun, the regiment passing over the spot where so many men were lost the evening before. The enemy fled and the Confederates marched through the deserted camp. General Hill in his report, says: It was a costly and useless sacrifice, for early the next morning our troops crossed the mill pond and the Federal forces, seeing their position turned, betook themselves to hasty flight. The Federals made a stand at Gaines' Mill, when the 38th was engaged, and the soldiers, though weary and worn, behaved nobly. About sundown, the shouting along the line announced the fact that the enemy was running and a victory was gained. After camping on the battlefield over night, the march was continued. Lieutenant-Colonel Armfield being sick, Major L. D. Andrews was now in command. The regiment was engaged at Cold Harbor and Frazier's Farm. At the latter place the Confederate troops fought with unusual bravery, not see
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.39 (search)
ent was comparatively slight. The major commanding the regiment, was again wounded, and sent to a hospital in Richmond, and was not able to rejoin his regiment until a few days before the battle at Ream's Station. The regiment participated in all the engagements in which its brigade took part, from Spotsylvania Court House to Petersburg, constantly skirmishing and fighting as Grant continued his march on Lee's flank. On the 3d of June, 1864, it was heavily engaged with the enemy near Gaines' Mill. In this fight, General W. W. Kirkland, commanding the brigade, was wounded. Pursuing its march and almost daily skirmishing, the regiment reached Petersburg on on the 24th day of June, 1864, and commenced the desultory and dreary work of duty in the trenches. During the latter part of July, 1864, the regiment left Petersburg for Stoney Creek, and whilst on the march, Colonel William MacRae, of the 15th North Carolina regiment, joined the brigade and assumed command, under orders. Thi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
., 364. Fayette Artillery, in the Movement on New Berne, N. C., 288. Federal Forces, Total of the, 303. Five Forks, Battle of, 16. Fitzhugh, Maj. P. H., killed, 14. Fleming, Robt. I., 355. Fleming, W. L, 45. Flowers, Col., Geo. W.. 245. Forrest, Gen. N. B.. Ability of, 45, 54. Frayser, Capt R. E.,369. Frazier's Farm, Battle of 98, 209, 211. Fredericksburg, Battle of, 96. Fugitive Slaves' Law, Author of, 190. Fulkerson, Col., Abram, 365. Gaines, E. W., 288. Gaines' Mill, Battle of, 97. Garland, Jr , Gen. Samuel, 157. Garrett. Col., killed, 171. Gettysburg Failure, Cause of the, 60. Georgia Battalion, Casualties in, April, 1865, Gibbs, Maj. W. H., 38. Gill, Sergeant-Maj W F., killed, 161. Gloucester County (Va.) Confederate dead of, I, 20. Goode, Col., J. Thomas, 3, 16. Gordon, A. C., 382. Gordon, Gen. John B., 105. Green, Lieut. J. M., 281. Gregg, Gen., Maxey, 107 Gregory Maj. W. F. C., 5. Grimball, Lieut., John, C. S. N.,