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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 328 328 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 126 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 120 0 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 63 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 62 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 38 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 36 2 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 30 0 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 30 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 28 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.). You can also browse the collection for Gaines Mill (Virginia, United States) or search for Gaines Mill (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book I:—Richmond. (search)
eaver-dam Creek, between Mechanicsville and Gaines' Mill, and on the right bank a vast wooded swamp,the left bank as far as the neighborhood of Gaines' Mill, had already constructed two bridges in conllan, who was sick at his headquarters near Gaines' Mill, had heard nothing from Heintzelman, to whowhole right wing. From his headquarters at Gaines' Mill he could see the smoke, which rose above they had put in motion the troops encamped at Gaines' Mill, on the evening of the 31st, or during the es to the course of the river, and on which Gaines' Mill is situated; but it had been laid out two otened to join the rest of Porter's corps at Gaines' Mill without being pursued. At noon on the 27ed. The resistance made by the Federals at Gaines' Mill, and their inaction on the other side of th been besieged in turn by the conquerors of Gaines' Mill; he would thereby have sacrificed his commuhe Chickahominy with his whole army between Gaines' Mill and Bottom's Bridge, and tried to force a p[17 more...]
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book III:—Maryland. (search)
We know the result. The three small independent armies of McDowell, Banks and Fremont, formed at the expense of the reinforcements intended for the army of the Potomac, had been beaten in detail. While Jackson was stealing away to repair to Gaines' Mill, the Union generals were only occupied in the reorganization of their troops, exhausted by forced marches and useless countermarches. McDowell returned, but too late, to his positions at Fredericksburg, on the Rappahannock; Banks concentratedn of Starke, which had relieved Hood, and which, sheltering itself behind trees, rocks and wall fences, opposed a desperate resistance to the vigorous attack of the Federals. Meade's Pennsylvanians, inured by the severe ordeals of Beaver Dam, Gaines' Mill, Glendale and Manassas, charged the enemy with impetuosity. The possession of the wood was disputed with great spirit. The fierceness of the struggle was equal on both sides, and the losses enormous; nearly all the chiefs were cut down; and
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book VI:—Virginia. (search)
on, immediately tendered his resignation to the President. It was not accepted, but Newton and Cochrane were retained in the posts they occupied. It was in the midst of these painful circumstances that the army of the Potomac witnessed the close of the year 1862, the first of its active existence:--this year, which was marked by so many memorable events-by the siege of Yorktown, the comparatively successful battles of Williamsburg and Fair Oaks, the sanguinary but honorable defeats of Gaines' Mill and Glendale, and the success of Malvern Hill-this year, which had witnessed the disaster of Manassas, the fatal capitulation of Harper's Ferry, the victories of South Mountain and Antietam, and which had closed with the terrible defeat of Fredericksburg. For the Confederate army of Northern Virginia, on the contrary, the year 1863 opened under the best auspices. Thanks to the despotic energy of the Richmond government, the absence of all political discussion in the interior of the Con
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), chapter 8 (search)
federate infantry eighty-three thousand two hundred and fifty men. The nine regiments of Stuart's cavalry could not count less than four thousand five hundred sabres, nor Pendleton's reserve less than one thousand five hundred artillerists, while the various staffs, escorts and detachments mustered between four and five thousand, making a total of about ninety-four thousand men. We also obtain this figure through another calculation. In the month of July, a few days after the battles of Gaines' Mill, Glendale and Malvern, the army reports exhibited a total of sixty-nine thousand five hundred and fiftyfour men present in the field. By adding the twenty thousand lost in killed, wounded and prisoners in those battles to the first figure, and five thousand crippled or sick incapacitated for active service after a week of forced marches, we still find the figure of ninety-four thousand men as the actual effective force of the Confederate army on the 26th of June. According to detailed