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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 252 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 118 32 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 83 83 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 62 0 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 43 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 32 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 25 5 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 25 5 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 24 4 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 21 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.). You can also browse the collection for Glendale, Va. (Virginia, United States) or search for Glendale, Va. (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book I:—Richmond. (search)
ption of the clearings of Frazier's Farm and Glendale, and the cultivated slopes of Malvern Hill, t Keyes with his two divisions had encamped at Glendale, in the neighborhood of Nelson's Farm. The tidge, leading directly from Savage station to Glendale—a precious discovery, although this road was sition previously occupied by Keyes' corps at Glendale. The latter had started for Turkey Bend, on occupied by Porter a few hours before, beyond Glendale. McCall had left Frazier's Farm, and his tro the intersection of these different roads at Glendale may be represented by a square, the four anglhite Oak Swamp on the Richmond side. Between Glendale and Malvern Hill small swamps, forming the sobattles of Savage station, Frazier's Farm and Glendale were huddled. There was scarcely a sufficienquagmire, four or five guns lost by McCall at Glendale, and as many dismounted pieces which Franklin no intention of defending Frazier's Farm and Glendale, and was waiting for the reports of the gener[17 more...]
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book III:—Maryland. (search)
ood of light upon the woods which separate the Antietam from the Potomac. Hooker deployed his three divisions, Doubleday on the right, Ricketts on the left and Meade in the centre. The latter was the first to encounter the small division of Starke, which had relieved Hood, and which, sheltering itself behind trees, rocks and wall fences, opposed a desperate resistance to the vigorous attack of the Federals. Meade's Pennsylvanians, inured by the severe ordeals of Beaver Dam, Gaines' Mill, Glendale and Manassas, charged the enemy with impetuosity. The possession of the wood was disputed with great spirit. The fierceness of the struggle was equal on both sides, and the losses enormous; nearly all the chiefs were cut down; and according to the statement of soldiers who participated in that contest, it was more sanguinary than any of those they had hitherto witnessed. But the efforts of Hooker's three divisions, all of which soon became engaged, were supported by the fire of the Feder
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book VI:—Virginia. (search)
s, along the military road, were Gregg's brigade on the right and Thomas' on the left. Meade's Pennsylvanians were well-tried troops whom we have already seen fighting gallantly before Richmond, at Beaver Dam and on the bloody battle-field of Glendale. As they advanced through the open plain which separated them from the woods, with a brilliant sun shining upon them, a sharp fire of musketry broke out along the entire skirt of the wood; and the Federal artillery having remained silent for fe2, the first of its active existence:--this year, which was marked by so many memorable events-by the siege of Yorktown, the comparatively successful battles of Williamsburg and Fair Oaks, the sanguinary but honorable defeats of Gaines' Mill and Glendale, and the success of Malvern Hill-this year, which had witnessed the disaster of Manassas, the fatal capitulation of Harper's Ferry, the victories of South Mountain and Antietam, and which had closed with the terrible defeat of Fredericksburg. F
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), chapter 8 (search)
antry eighty-three thousand two hundred and fifty men. The nine regiments of Stuart's cavalry could not count less than four thousand five hundred sabres, nor Pendleton's reserve less than one thousand five hundred artillerists, while the various staffs, escorts and detachments mustered between four and five thousand, making a total of about ninety-four thousand men. We also obtain this figure through another calculation. In the month of July, a few days after the battles of Gaines' Mill, Glendale and Malvern, the army reports exhibited a total of sixty-nine thousand five hundred and fiftyfour men present in the field. By adding the twenty thousand lost in killed, wounded and prisoners in those battles to the first figure, and five thousand crippled or sick incapacitated for active service after a week of forced marches, we still find the figure of ninety-four thousand men as the actual effective force of the Confederate army on the 26th of June. According to detailed accounts, t