hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 304 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 92 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 58 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 56 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 46 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 24 0 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 22 4 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 20 0 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 18 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 18 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1: prelminary narrative. You can also browse the collection for Groveton (Virginia, United States) or search for Groveton (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 1 document section:

such calamities, the battle of Cedar Mountain created, especially in Massachusetts, a sense of loss and sorrow surpassing that produced by many larger conflicts later in the war. The engagements at Kelley's Ford, Rappahannock, Kettle Run and Groveton in August cost little to the few Massachusetts regiments engaged, but the second battle of Bull Run (Manassas), fought by Pope on his retreat Aug. 30, 1862, involved a number of Massachusetts regiments in action and nine in actual losses. The st of the colonel, in utter disregard of orders, but finally sustained by the brigade commander. They never, perhaps, like some Confederate regiments, made charges without military formation, as at Charles City, or used stones for missiles, as at Groveton; Johnson's Short History of Secession, pp. 168, 181. but they were often, at the outset, equipped with muskets so poor as to be more efficient when clubbed than in any other way. There were among them individual instances of cowardice, See