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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 158 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 105 3 Browse Search
James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 76 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 68 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 62 4 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 58 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 48 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 40 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 40 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 36 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4.. You can also browse the collection for Hampton Roads (Virginia, United States) or search for Hampton Roads (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 7.51 (search)
eet, and in their crowded and confused condition it seemed to be a matter of no difficulty to pick out whatever victims the Confederate commander (Admiral Franklin Buchanan) might desire, as he had done in 1861 when commanding the Merrimac in Hampton Roads. Before he could reach them the line had become straightened, and the leading vessels had passed the fort. Admiral Jenkins, who commanded the Richmond during the fight, writing of this part of the fight, for the use of the present writer, scur until after 10 o'clock that night, when the Fort was evacuated.--editors. resist the temptation to inform him that they had met before under different circumstances, the captain having been on the frigate Cumberland when she was sunk in Hampton Roads by Buchanan in the Merrimac. The casualties of the Union fleet, as reported by Admiral Farragut, were 52 killed and 170 wounded, as follows:  Killed.Wounded. Hartford2528 Brooklyn1143 Lackawanna4 35 Oneida830 Monongahela First-L
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Confederate cruisers. (search)
nto the Florida, striking her on the starboard quarter, cutting down her bulwarks and carrying away her mizzenmast. As the Wachusett backed off, and the Florida was clearly not in a sinking condition, Collins fired one or two volleys of small-arms, and also two discharges from his heavy guns, upon which the Florida surrendered. At the time of the capture, the captain and a large part of the crew of the Florida were on shore; the remainder were taken prisoners. The Florida was taken to Hampton Roads, where she was afterward sunk by collision with a transport. The United States made the amende honorable to Brazil, and Captain Collins was tried by court-martial. The second cruiser built in England, through the agency of Captain Bulloch, was the Alabama, whose career is described in another place. [See p. 600.] Notwithstanding the very urgent representations of Mr. Adams, accompanied by depositions which left no doubt as to the character and objects of the vessel, she was permitte
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 13.95 (search)
the flag-ship. As soon as it became known that I had returned, rockets were thrown up and all hands were called to cheer ship; and when I announced success, all the commanding officers were summoned on board to deliberate upon a plan of attack. In the morning I was well again in every way, with the exception of hands and feet, and had the pleasure of exchanging shots with the batteries that I had inspected the day before. I was sent in the Valley City to report to Admiral Porter at Hampton Roads, and soon after Plymouth and the whole district of the Albemarle, deprived of the iron-clad's protection, fell an easy prey to Commander Macomb and our fleet. The list of officers and men on board Picket-boat No. 1, on the expedition of October 27th, 1864, with the vessels to which they were officially attached, was as follows: Lieutenant William B. Cashing, commanding, Monticello; Acting Assistant Paymaster Francis H. Swan, Otsego; Acting Ensign William L. Howarth, Monticello; Actin
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Navy at Fort Fisher. (search)
e fort, the skirmish-line within Captain K. R. Breese. From a photograph. Major General A. H. Terry. From a photograph. fifty yards. Butler and Weitzel decided that it could not be taken by assault. Orders were issued to reembark after being on shore but a few hours. Some seven hundred men were left on shore, the sea being too rough to get them off, but the demoralized enemy did not attempt to attack them. They were taken off in the morning, and the transports steamed away for Hampton Roads, the fleet returning to Beaufort. Thus ended the first attack upon Fort Fisher. Words cannot express the bitter feeling and chagrin of the navy. We all felt the fruit was ripe for plucking and with little exertion would have fallen into the hands of the army. Second attack upon Fort Fisher. Upon receiving Admiral Porter's dispatches, Mr. Welles again sought the cooperation of the army, to which General Grant at once acceded, sending back the same force of white troops, reenforc
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Closing operations in the James River. (search)
part of the river was left in the undisturbed possession of the Confederates, who took the opportunity to fit out a squadron of considerable strength. The nucleus of this squadron was found in the gun-boats which had assisted the Merrimac in Hampton Roads, viz., the Patrick Henry, Beaufort, Raleigh, and Teazer. The Jamestown, which had also been in Tattnall's squadron, was sunk as an obstruction at Drewry's Bluff. Three other gun-boats, the Hampton and Nansemond, which had been built at Norfoof armor on the sides and eight on the ends. She carried two 8-inch and two 6-inch Brooke rifles, and was the strongest vessel at any time in the Confederate service. The opening of the year 1864 found the North Atlantic squadron still in Hampton Roads, and without so much as a foothold in the James River. Early in the year two joint expeditions of the army and the navy were made into the country in the neighborhood of the Nansemond, then occupied by scattered forces of the enemy. The fir