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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 158 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 105 3 Browse Search
James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 76 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 68 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 62 4 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 58 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 48 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 40 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 40 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 36 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Hampton Roads (Virginia, United States) or search for Hampton Roads (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 24 results in 4 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
ou the essential facts about the Battle in Hampton Roads between the Confederate ironclad, Virginiates Congress and Cumberland, then lying in Hampton Roads. She was commanded by Admiral Franklin Bu the Merrimac was disabled and driven from Hampton Roads into Norfolk is entirely incorrect and abs expected fray, the Merrimac again went to Hampton Roads. The Monitor was laying at our moorings, battle to the Federal fleet then lying in Hampton Roads, or below Old Point. The Merrimac was theve foundered. She could not have lived in Hampton Roads in a moderate gale. I served in the Paly, that the Monitor made her appearance in Hampton Roads at a critical time—the night of the 8th ofatteries, through the obstructions, across Hampton Roads, to the mouth of James river, where off Ne11th of April he took the Virginia down to Hampton Roads, expecting to have a desperate encounter wsburg, and the Nineteenth corps arrived in Hampton Roads from the South was also ordered to Washing[2 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Merrimac and Monitor. (search)
d to you the essential facts about the Battle in Hampton Roads between the Confederate ironclad, Virginia (Merr frigates Congress and Cumberland, then lying in Hampton Roads. She was commanded by Admiral Franklin Buchanant that the Merrimac was disabled and driven from Hampton Roads into Norfolk is entirely incorrect and absurb. ch might have been made. When the Merrimac left Hampton Roads for Norfolk, the Monitor had passed over the baror the expected fray, the Merrimac again went to Hampton Roads. The Monitor was laying at our moorings, at thers from those engaged in the naval operations in Hampton Roads from March 8, 1862, to May 6, 1862. I command offer battle to the Federal fleet then lying in Hampton Roads, or below Old Point. The Merrimac was the only uld have foundered. She could not have lived in Hampton Roads in a moderate gale. I served in the Palmetto erfully, that the Monitor made her appearance in Hampton Roads at a critical time—the night of the 8th of March
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Services of the Virginia (Merrimac). (search)
customed. The attack was postponed to Saturday, March 8th. The weather was favorable. We left the navy yard at 11 A. M, against the last half of the flood tide, steamed down the river past our batteries, through the obstructions, across Hampton Roads, to the mouth of James river, where off Newports News lay at anchor the frigates Cumberland and Congress, protected by strong batteries and gunboats. The action commenced about 3 P. M. by our firing the bow-gun It killed and wounded ten m supplied with bolts of wrought and chilled iron. The ship was brought a foot deeper in the water, making her draft 23 feet. Commodore Josiah Tatnall relieved Admiral Buchanan in command. On the 11th of April he took the Virginia down to Hampton Roads, expecting to have a desperate encounter with the Monitor. Greatly to our surprise, the Monitor refused to fight us. She closely hugged the shore under the guns of the fort, with her steam up. Hoping to provoke her to come out, the Jamestown
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Shenandoah Valley in 1864, by George E. Pond—Campaigns of the civil war, XI. (search)
Washington during the afternoon of the 11th, while Bradley Johnson with a portion of the cavalry was making a circuit about Baltimore and breaking the railroads from the north. Great panic and consternation was produced in Washington and at the North. President Lincoln called for hundred day volunteers, Hunter was ordered to hasten forward from West Virginia to Harper's Ferry. Grant sent up the other two divisions of the Sixth corps from Petersburg, and the Nineteenth corps arrived in Hampton Roads from the South was also ordered to Washington. Some 20,000 troops of one kind or other were in and about Washington, half of whom, at least, were available for holding the defences until the troops sent by Grant could arrive. Early's forces after their severe march of near 300 miles from Salem were greatly worn, and probably did not number 10,000 men in front of Washington. It was never possible for them to enter the city. The garrison was ample to hold them in check until the arriva