hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 70 0 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 52 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 47 1 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 19 1 Browse Search
John G. Nicolay, A Short Life of Abraham Lincoln, condensed from Nicolay and Hayes' Abraham Lincoln: A History 18 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 18 2 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 18 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 17 1 Browse Search
G. S. Hillard, Life and Campaigns of George B. McClellan, Major-General , U. S. Army 15 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 14 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Harrison's Landing (Virginia, United States) or search for Harrison's Landing (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 24 results in 9 document sections:

o arms. The enemy were reported massing their forces. We were preparing to repel them. At noon silence was broken by hostile cannon in the extreme front. As afternoon wore away, the bombardment increased. At five o'clock there was a battle, and the Aroostook was hurling shell into the woods. At about seven o'clock the firing was heavy, but it was confined to a narrow circle. Ayres was driving the enemy from his batteries. Our boat pushed from the landing. At dark we moved from Harrison's Landing, seven miles below. The army had not moved there; the trains had. Soon after we steamed into the channel, the bombardment grew heavier. The gunboats were thundering into the forests. When I left the prospect was cheerless. That night we met reenforcements. Before morning the army was strengthened. Pray God it was made strong enough to go to Richmond. People, you may still rely on Gen. McClellan, until further displays of capacity. His retreat was masterly. He carried all t
Battle of Glendale, June 30, 1862. known also as the battle of White Oak swamp and Charles City cross-roads. Report of General Hooker. headquarters Hooker's division, Third army corps, camp near Harrison's Landing, James Riyer, Va., July 15, 1862. Captain C. McKeever, Assistant Adjutant-General Third Army Corps: In obedience to instructions, my command was withdrawn from its advanced position before Richmond about sunrise, on the twenty-ninth ultimo. We retired, in condition to give or receive battle, as occasion might require, to a new line a mile or more in the rear, where it was halted and drawn up to check any advance of the enemy, either by the Williamsburgh road or railroad. The enemy followed up our movements closely, taking possession of our camps as soon as they were abandoned, but evincing no disposition to come to close quarters. We remained in our new position until about three o'clock P. M., with no other event than a feeble attack on Sumner's advance
nd. Further official reports will be given in the Supplement. Report of General Hooker. headquarters Hooker's division, Third army corps, camp near Harrison's Landing, James River, Va., July 18, 1862. Captain C. McKeever, Assistant Adjutant-General, Third Army Corps: After withdrawing from Glendale, our march was contind Third brigades were not engaged during the day, and remained in their position until near morning, when orders were received to march in the direction of Harrison's Landing. I transmit herewith the reports of brigade, regimental, and battery commanders. I desire to make honorable mention of Captain John S. Godfrey, the Ast servant, Joseph Hooker, Brigadler-General Commanding Division. Official report of General Howe. headquarters Howe's brigade, Couch's division, Harrison's Landing, Va., July 5, 1862. Captain: In obedience to instructions from the headquarters of the First division of the Fourth army corps, I have the honor to submit a
Doc. 79.-General McClellan's address. headquarters army of the Potomac, camp near Harrison's Landing, July 4, 1862. Soldiers of the army of the Potomac: Your achievements of the last ten days have illustrated the valor and endurance of the American soldier. Attacked by superior forces, and without hope of reenforcements, you have succeeded in changing your base of operations by a flank movement, always regarded as the most hazardous of military expedients. You have saved all your material, all your trains and all your guns, except a few lost in battle, taking in return guns and colors from the enemy. Upon your march, you have been assailed day after day with desperate fury, by men of the same race and nation, skilfully massed and led. Under every disadvantage of number, and necessarily of position also, you have in every conflict beaten back your foes with enormous slaughter. Your conduct ranks you among the celebrated armies of history. No one will now question that ea
menced the series of battles which preceded and attended the retreat of Gen. McClellan from the Chickahominy toward Harrison's Landing. When first General McClellan began to intimate by his despatches that he designed making this movement toward Jamestly urged them upon the President and the Secretary of War. After General McClellan had taken up his position at Harrison's Landing, I addressed him a letter, stating to him my position and the distribution of the troops under my command, and requetachments from his main force at Richmond as would enable the army of the Potomac to withdraw from its position at Harrison's Landing, and to take shipping for Acquia Creek or for Alexandria; and if, as was feared, the enemy should throw his whole fst. This small fraction of twenty thousand five hundred men was all of the ninety-one thousand veteran troops from Harrison's Landing which ever drew trigger under my command, or in any way took part in that campaign. By the time that the corps of
menced the series of battles which preceded and attended the retreat of Gen. McClellan from the Chickahominy toward Harrison's Landing. When first General McClellan began to intimate by his despatches that he designed making this movement toward Jamestly urged them upon the President and the Secretary of War. After General McClellan had taken up his position at Harrison's Landing, I addressed him a letter, stating to him my position and the distribution of the troops under my command, and requetachments from his main force at Richmond as would enable the army of the Potomac to withdraw from its position at Harrison's Landing, and to take shipping for Acquia Creek or for Alexandria; and if, as was feared, the enemy should throw his whole fst. This small fraction of twenty thousand five hundred men was all of the ninety-one thousand veteran troops from Harrison's Landing which ever drew trigger under my command, or in any way took part in that campaign. By the time that the corps of
Doc. 165.-bombardment on James River. A correspondent with the James River fleet gives the following account of the midnight bombardment on the river: United States ship Cimerone, one and A half miles below Harrison's Landing, August 1--1.15 A. M. I was awakened at this hour by a rapid cannonading from the south bank of the river, and of course orders were given to beat to quarters at once. In five minutes every man was at his post, and our guns began to reply. Our two one hundred-pounder guns--one rifled — soon made a perceptible impression on the rebel batteries, but still they continued to fire on us with great rapidity for over an hour. At half-past 2 the rebel fire had slackened greatly, and at five minutes of three we had completely silenced their batteries. Our twenty-four-pounder brass howitzers did excellent service. Our largest guns threw five and ten-second shells, which made a telling impression upon the enemy. At fifteen minutes past three, orders were give
Doc. 171.-occupation of Malvern Hill, Va. New-York Tribune account. camp near Harrison's Landing, Wednesday morning, August 6, 1862. Hooker and Sedgwick repossessed Malvern Hills yesterday morning. They marched circuitously to the right, and approached in the rear of that position, having the enemy between them and the river. He may have been four thousand strong. The ball opened with artillery, both parties throwing spherical case; the enemy throwing more and making better practice than he usually does. His guns were numerous in proportion to his men. The duel began on Nelson's farm. Leaving that position, the enemy fell back two miles, to Malvern, and made a stand. Here the battle raged an hour, the gunboats participating; I do not think they were of any service, however. By an hour, the enemy was becoming silent. Soon after we advanced, not firing again. The bayonet was sufficient. The enemy did not stand an instant, nor fire a shot. He had already withdraw
Doc. 184.-evacuation of Harrison's Landing. Harrison's Landing, Saturday, Aug. 16, 1862. Harrison's Landing is evHarrison's Landing, Saturday, Aug. 16, 1862. Harrison's Landing is evacuated. Without a struggle, without a blow, without even the loss of a single man, the immense army of the Potomac, officeHarrison's Landing is evacuated. Without a struggle, without a blow, without even the loss of a single man, the immense army of the Potomac, officers and men, bag and baggage, stores, tents, horses, ammunition, and contrabands, are now far away from Harrison's Landing, lHarrison's Landing, leaving it a deserted and desolate plain. For several days this important movement has been going on. Ten days ago, when on the way from Fortress Monroe to Harrison's Landing, in the mail-boat John A. Warner, I was convinced that the evacuation h same day General McClellan and Colonel Ingalls left Harrison's Landing for the nearest telegraph station, and communicated rally known that the whole army was about evacuating Harrison's Landing. On Thursday night fifty sail of vessels left the dous duties of guarding the depots at White House and Harrison's Landing with credit to themselves and satisfaction to the wh