Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: January 25, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Hilton Head (South Carolina, United States) or search for Hilton Head (South Carolina, United States) in all documents.

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city on Wednesday afternoon last, intending to spend the night ducking. Their intention was to obtain a ducking boat at Fig Island light, and proceed to the opposite shore, but not to go below Fort Jackson, to hunt ducks in the river and creeks, and return in the morning. As they have not been seen or heard of since Wednesday evening, it is feared that they were captured during Wednesday night by the boats of the enemy, which are known to prowl about in the creeks between our river and Hilton Head during the night. We know Mr. Barron, who is a native of Baltimore, to be a true and loyal Southron, and can account for his absence only on the ground that he has been drowned or captured by the enemy. The Prussian Minister's Dispatch. The following is a translated copy of the dispatch of Count Bernstoff, Prussian Minister of Foreign Affairs, to the Prussian ambassador at Washington, on the Trent affair: Berlin,Dec. 25, 1861. Monsieur Le Baron:The warlike measures whi
The rebel schooner Venus was taken off Galveston by the Rhode Island, and the following prisoners have been brought on:--Andrew Nelson, captain; Peter Hanson, mate; Edward Hicklet, cook; Cornelius J. Haven, Charles Eastwood, Charles Smith, Timothy Canards, Edward English, Jos. Parker, Francis Callahan, James Smith, Alfred Johnson, and Jacob Johnson. The following prisoners deserted Tatnall's fleet, off Savannah;--Daniel B. Harrington, John King. Those who follow were taken at Hilton Head, and confined for some time on board the Wabash: --Jacob Judy, James T. Bryan, James J. Colson, Capt. Geo. J. Mahe. Mr. Mahe is a citizen of Louisiana. He is a nephew of Charles M. Conrad, Secretary of War, under President Fillmore. He was also Assistant Secretary of Legation, under Mr. Faulkner, to France. He was at the battles of Bull Run and Ball's Bluff. From the latter place he went on to New Orleans, on furlough. He was taken while fishing off that port. The Philadelp