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our thousand. We captured about six thousand prisoners, beside the wounded left in our hands, forty-two pieces of artillery, five thousand or six thousand small arms, and a large train. The enemy's loss in killed and wounded is not known. While Generals Thomas and Hooker pushed Bragg's army into Georgia, General Sherman, with his own and General Granger's forces, was sent into East-Tennessee to prevent the return of Longstreet, and to relieve General Burnside, who was then besieged in Knoxville. We have reliable information that General Sherman has successfully accomplished his object, and that Longstreet is in full retreat toward Virginia, but no details have been received in regard to Sherman's operations since he crossed the Hiawassee River. Of Burnside's defence of Knoxville, it is only known that every attack of the enemy on that place was successfully repulsed. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, H. W. Halleck, General-in-Chief. Hon. E. M. Stanton, Secretary of War.
Dalton road. On the thirtieth, the army moved to Charleston, General Howard approaching so rapidly that the enemy evacuated in haste, leaving the bridge but partially damaged, and five car-loads of flour and provisions on the north bank of the Hiawassee. This was to have been the limit of our journey. Officers and men had brought no luggage or provisions, and the weather was bitter cold. I had hardly entered the town of Charleston, when General Wilson arrived with a letter from General Gr to be done. General Howard, that night, repaired and planked the railroad bridge, and at daylight the army passed the Hiawassee, and marched to Athens, fifteen miles. I had supposed rightfully that General Granger was about the mouth of the Hiawassee, and sent him notice of my orders that the General had sent me a copy of his written instructions, which were full and complete, and that he must push for Kingston, near which we would make a junction. By the time I reached Athens, I had time
one thousand two hundred or one thousand five hundred cavalry and mounted infantry, attacked Colonel Siebert, and captured a supply-train from Chattanooga, for Knoxville, about ten o'clock this morning, at Charlestown, on the south bank of the Hiawassee. The train escort had reached the encampment at Charlestown last night, and Colonel Siebert's skirmishers hotly engaged with the enemy this morning before Colonel Long was apprised of their approach. He immediately moved the small force f of that flag gave information which induced Wheeler to follow my track. The miserable state of the weather and worse condition of the roads, prevented me from moving fast, and it was the twenty-seventh before I reached Charlestown on the Hiawassee River. On the morning of the twenty-eighth, I commenced moving my train across a temporary bridge on the ties of the railroad structure, but had only a few wagons over when it was found necessary to dig a new road in the railroad dyke. Whilst th
utenant, thirty (30) horses, and twenty stand of arms. The Nashville and Chattanooga Railroad, having been completed on the fourteenth instant, and trains running regularly from Nashville to this point, steps were immediately taken to commence repairing the East-Tennessee and Georgia Railroad. The First division of the Fourth corps, Major-General D. S. Stanley commanding, was ordered, on the twenty-fourth, to take up a position north of Chattanooga, between Chickamauga Depot and the Hiawassee River, to protect the repairs on the railroad. General Hooker, commanding the Eleventh and Twelfth corps, was ordered to relieve Stanley's division, then stationed on the Nashville and Chattanooga Railroad, between Whitesides and Bridgeport. January twenty-eighth, Major-General J. M. Palmer, commanding Fourteenth army corps, with a portion of his command, made a reconnoissance toward the enemy's position on Tunnel Hill. He found him still in force at that point, and the object of the mov