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John Bell Hood., Advance and Retreat: Personal Experiences in the United States and Confederate Armies 2 0 Browse Search
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Creek and Snake Creek Gaps, the short line of retreat, since the railroad south of Kingston deflects greatly to the east One blow in rear of an army is always more to be feared than ten in front, and it would have required only a good roar of musketry, near Tunnel Hill, to have hastened the enemy back to the firing. I have too high a regard for General Sherman's sagacity, as a soldier, to believe that he would have moved the main body of his Army down the valley between Rocky-faced and Horn Mountains, in the direction of Rome, leaving an army of seventy thousand (70,000) at Dalton, in his rear, unless he felt assured, from past history, that his adversary would retreat. General Johnston and Senator Wigfall have strenuously labored to show that there were not seventy thousand (70,000) available troops at and near Dalton on the 6th of May, 1864. I claim, however, that I have, by figures and official data, demonstrated to any unbiassed mind that they were available and within the ea