hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 22 0 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 10 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 8 0 Browse Search
Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 8 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 6 0 Browse Search
A. J. Bennett, private , First Massachusetts Light Battery, The story of the First Massachusetts Light Battery , attached to the Sixth Army Corps : glance at events in the armies of the Potomac and Shenandoah, from the summer of 1861 to the autumn of 1864. 6 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1: prelminary narrative 2 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1: prelminary narrative. You can also browse the collection for Hupp Hill (Virginia, United States) or search for Hupp Hill (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 1 result in 1 document section:

y wrote to Lee, the fact is, that the enemy's cavalry is so much superior to ours, both in numbers and equipment ... that it is impossible for ours to compete with it. This was in curious contrast with the comparative condition of the two forces at the outset of the war. At the easy but final victory of Waynesboroa, March 2, 1865, only the 2d Cavalry of Massachusetts troops took part, with small loss. Early took Crook's command (Thoburn's division) completely by surprise October 13 at Hupp's Hill, near Strasburg, throwing shells among them while they were eating dinner, with guns stacked. Forming hastily in line, they encountered him, Wells's brigade (including the 34th Mass.) being on the left. Wells was obliged at length to retreat, having suffered severely; and he himself was mortally wounded and fell into the enemy's hands. The Union troops suffered much more than the Confederates from this unexpected attack, although both sides had fought well. It was followed up by a muc