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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
y. We learned, also, that another force was threatening James Island, and that the Thirty-second had been sent, with other tadest. Upon the west side the Island is separated from James Island by Vincent's Creek and by broad marshes intersected by st day nor night. We were landed at Fort Johnson, on James Island, a little before dawn on the 18th and were just getting left, and not until reinforcements were sent down from James Island to the assistance of the garrison, were these assailantnstructed within the city limits and upon the shores of James Island; some to command the ship channel, and others to deliveour side, Moultrie, Sumter, Gregg, and the batteries on James Island, Johnson, Haskell and Cheves, joined in the fray. It wse batteries, as well as the others along the shores of James Island, proved very annoying to the enemy, and the accuracy of searched by the unremitting fire from our batteries on James Island. The head of the sap was slowly pushed forward under t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of service in Charleston Harbor in 1863. (search)
ed during the night, had effected a lodgment on the south end of Morris Island, and had driven our forces back upon Wagner, which fortification would, doubtless, be attacked on the next day. We learned, also, that another force was threatening James Island, and that the Thirty-second had been sent, with other troops, to meet that danger. Events proved that this last was a feint, to distract attention from the main attack. All day we remained quietly at this place, endeavoring to make out thet is a long, narrow strip of sand, running almost due north and south for about four miles, varying in breadth from, say one hundred yards at the narrowest point to half a mile at the broadest. Upon the west side the Island is separated from James Island by Vincent's Creek and by broad marshes intersected by numerous salt water creeks, while its eastern shore is washed throughout its entire length by the waters of the Atlantic Ocean. At the south end were the batteries from which our troops h
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of services in Charleston Harbor. (search)
e, as there was no rest day nor night. We were landed at Fort Johnson, on James Island, a little before dawn on the 18th and were just getting comfortably settled in the salient on the left, and not until reinforcements were sent down from James Island to the assistance of the garrison, were these assailants finally overpowerednew batteries were constructed within the city limits and upon the shores of James Island; some to command the ship channel, and others to deliver a flanking fire, thor hours, while from our side, Moultrie, Sumter, Gregg, and the batteries on James Island, Johnson, Haskell and Cheves, joined in the fray. It was certainly a sublimn Morris Inland. These batteries, as well as the others along the shores of James Island, proved very annoying to the enemy, and the accuracy of their fire is mentios, his left flank was searched by the unremitting fire from our batteries on James Island. The head of the sap was slowly pushed forward under the ceaseless fire of
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Who fired the first gun at Sumter? (search)
ions before the 15th of April he would receive them, and in that event he would not surrender. This reply being unsatisfactory, Colonel James Chesnut and Captain S. D. Lee gave the Major a written communication, dated Fort Sumter, S. C., April 12, 1861, 3:20 A. M., informing him, by authority of General Beauregard, that the batteries of General Beauregard would open fire on the fort in one hour from that time. The party, as designated, then proceeded in their boats to Fort Johnson, on James Island, and delivered the order to Captain George S. James, commanding the mortar battery, to open fire on Fort Sumter. At 4:30 A. M. the first gun was fired at Fort Sumter, and at 4:40 the second gun was fired from the same battery. Captain James offered the honor of firing the first shot to Roger A. Pryor, of Virginia. He declined; saying he could not fire the first gun. Another officer then offered to take Pryor's place. James replied: No! I will fire it myself. And he did fire it. At 4