Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for James Island (South Carolina, United States) or search for James Island (South Carolina, United States) in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Letters from Fort Sumter in 1862 and 1863. (search)
officers in the Fort, and a general gloom is spread over the countenances of all here now. And now I will try and tell you something about our situation on James Island, as I have had the chance of learning, having in company with some other officers in the Fort visited the Island, on Sunday last, the day before the battle, an it comes within range nothing protects it from the volleys of our infantry. Secessionville is a very important point on the creek that divides Morris's from James's Island and constitutes our extreme left flank, and if taken the enemy could turn our left. It was for this reason, no doubt, that the attack was made the other day to come from that quarter to attack us, as the stream is only navigable to very small boats, and that, too, only at very high tides. Their object is to take James's Island and plant mortar batteries. While on the island we visited our outposts, and I had the pleasure of seeing, from the top of a tree, the Yankee pickets, abou
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Secessionville. (search)
pressure upon our time. We give now the first instalment, to be followed by others.] Headquarters advanced forces, James Island, June 18th, 1862. Captain,—I am required to report the operations of the troops under my command on the 16th instanVery respectfully, Johnson Hagood, Colonel 1st S. C. V., Commanding Advanced Forces. Capt. Mallory P. King, A. A. G., James Island. headquarters James Island, June 22, 1862. Colonel Hagood, Commanding Advanced Line, East Division, James Island: James Island, June 22, 1862. Colonel Hagood, Commanding Advanced Line, East Division, James Island: Colonel,—In the absence of General Evans, first in command on the 16th instant, allow me to thank you for your distinguished ser-vices on that day, and through you to thank Colonel Stevens, Colonel Simonton and the other gallant officers and men uJames Island: Colonel,—In the absence of General Evans, first in command on the 16th instant, allow me to thank you for your distinguished ser-vices on that day, and through you to thank Colonel Stevens, Colonel Simonton and the other gallant officers and men under your command, for their noble and gallant service at that time. Please make known my views to your command. Very respectfully, sir, your obedient servant, Wm. Duncan Smith, Brigadier-General Comman
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Letters from Fort Sumter. (search)
the Fort is still tenable, though no one expects it to be held any length of time. The object of holding now is to get time to build or complete batteries on James's Island. Powder is being moved out as rapidly as possible. It is not impossible to save them, but it is probable that the guns will be blown up with the Fort when wcer, together with a negro waiter. It seems to be the policy of General Beauregard to hold the Fort at all hazards until he gets his fortifications completed on James and Sullivan's Islands, when we will probably be sent to the latter place. I don't think that the enemy will make an assault. If they do, however, they will findly; and while I write this morning, the firing is going on slowly again. Last night two of our companies were relieved from here and sent to the batteries on James's Island. Their place was supplied by two picked Georgia companies. There are now only two of our own companies in the Fort-Captain Harleston's and Captain Fleming's
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Morris Island. (search)
Morris Island. By Miss Claudine Rhett. Five miles from Charleston lies Morris Island, facing the broad Atlantic to the east, and divided from James Island by a wide marsh and a winding channel. It is a bare, desolate tract of barren land, scarcely rising above the level of the water. The wind sweeps over it, whirling the swas killed at Battery Wagner; Battery Simpkins, after Major John Simpkins, of the Regulars, who also fell at this post; Battery Haskell and Battery Kringle, on James Island, after Captain Charles Haskell, of the Regulars, and Captain Robert Kringle, besides many others, which cannot all be enumerated. In this way the most import done on our defences. The wounded were taken to Comming's Point and embarked first. After their departure the infantry were taken across to Fort Johnson, on James Island; next followed the artillerists, then the rear-guard, which was composed of a small detachment of Regulars from Battery Gregg and Battery Wagner, and, last of