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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 8 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Col. Robert White, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.2, West Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 6, 1862., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Little Sewell Mountain (West Virginia, United States) or search for Little Sewell Mountain (West Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
e, and asked me where was General Wise's brigade. I informed him; he thanked me and rode in the direction I had given him. Upon meeting one of my officers I asked who was that noble looking officer just passed our camp; he replied that it was General Robert E. Lee, who at that time was little known to the Confederacy, but was destined to become one of the greatest captains the world ever saw, and whose name will ever live upon the brightest page of the historian. After remaining at Little Sewell mountain upwards of two weeks, General Lee made preparations to attack General Rosecrans; contrary, doubtless, to General Lee's expectations, on the morning the attack was to be made, General Rosecrans had very quietly evacuated Big Sewell, and only left a few broken down horses and wagons, and a few tents pitched to make it appear that he still occupied his position. This was considered a very ingenious piece of strategy, as General Lee was much disappointed when he found that General Rose
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of Floyd's operations in West Virginia in 1861. (search)
e, and asked me where was General Wise's brigade. I informed him; he thanked me and rode in the direction I had given him. Upon meeting one of my officers I asked who was that noble looking officer just passed our camp; he replied that it was General Robert E. Lee, who at that time was little known to the Confederacy, but was destined to become one of the greatest captains the world ever saw, and whose name will ever live upon the brightest page of the historian. After remaining at Little Sewell mountain upwards of two weeks, General Lee made preparations to attack General Rosecrans; contrary, doubtless, to General Lee's expectations, on the morning the attack was to be made, General Rosecrans had very quietly evacuated Big Sewell, and only left a few broken down horses and wagons, and a few tents pitched to make it appear that he still occupied his position. This was considered a very ingenious piece of strategy, as General Lee was much disappointed when he found that General Rose
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Anecdotes of General R. E. Lee. (search)
earned to appreciate her great leader. General Floyd had fallen back from Sewell Mountain, West Va., before the advancing columns of Rosecrans. Floyd being the ranking Brigadier, ordered Wise to follow him from his camp on Sewell to Meadow Bluff, twelve miles eastward and to the rear. Wise swore he would not retreat another foot, that Little Sewell was the place to make a stand, and positively refusing to obey General Floyd's order, commenced to fortify his position on the top of Little Sewell Mountain. Floyd reported to General Lee, who was in command of that department, but many miles away, the insubordination of General Wise; meanwhile Rosecrans had reached the top of Big Sewell and also stopping, began to strengthen his position, and with his largely superior force was threatening the annihiliation of the Wise Legion. General Lee, divining at once the serious position of affairs, hurried with his staff rapidly across the country, ordering his other troops to follow. Coming