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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 0 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2 10 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 8 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 8 0 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 6 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 4 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 4 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 4 0 Browse Search
Raphael Semmes, Memoirs of Service Afloat During the War Between the States 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for Liverpool (Mississippi, United States) or search for Liverpool (Mississippi, United States) in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 21: capture of New Orleans.--first attack on Vicksburg by Farragut's fleet and mortar flotilla.--junction of flag-officers Farragut and Davis above Vicksburg.--ram Arkansas. (search)
ant, Selim E. Woodworth, Lieutenant-Commander, United States Navy. Commander D. D. Porter, Commanding Mortar Flotilla. Engagement with the ram Arkansas, July 15, 1862. United States Flag-Ship Hartford, below Vicksburg, July 17, 1862. Sir — It is with deep mortification that I announce to the department that, notwithstanding my prediction to the contrary, the iron-clad ram Arkansas has at length made her appearance and taken us all by surprise. We had heard that she was up at Liverpool, in the Yazoo River, and Lieutenant-Colonel Ellet informed me that the river was too narrow for our gun-boats to turn, and was also shallow in places, but suggested that Flag-officer Davis might send up some of his ironclad boats, which draw only six or seven feet of water. When this was proposed to Flag-officer Davis he consented immediately, and General Williams offered to send up a few sharpshooters. The next morning they went off at daylight, and by six in the morning we heard firi
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 43: operations of the Mississippi squadron, under Admiral Porter, after the Red River expedition. (search)
sissippi squadron, under Admiral Porter, after the Red River expedition. Operations on the Tennessee and Cumberland Rivers. suppressing guerillas. gun-boats co-operating with Sherman in expedition to Meridian. silencing batteries at Liverpool. gun-boats damaged. pushing up the Yazoo. the expedition falls back. dashing attack on Waterloo. the Forest Rose drives Confederates out of Waterproof. important services rendered by tin-clads. expedition up Black and Washita Rivers. l Coates. When they arrived near Yazoo City, it was discovered that the enemy were in force at that place with batteries of field-pieces on the hills. On the 2d of February the expedition reached Sartalia, and next day attacked the enemy at Liverpool, where there were 2,700 men with artillery, under General Ross. The gun-boats silenced the batteries, and the Federal troops landed and took possession of the enemy's position, which they occupied until night-fall and then re-embarked, and the
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 44: battle of Mobile Bay. (search)
ps-of-war could not follow them. The city of Mobile, in consequence, became one of the most important rendezvous for blockade-runners, as it was situated some miles up the bay, and could only be reached through tortuous channels, with which only experienced pilots were familiar. The people of Mobile felt quite secure against any attempt on the part of the Union gun-boats to pass their defences, and the blockade-runners laid as safely at their wharves as if they had been in the docks of Liverpool. While the forts at the entrance of Mobile Bay remained intact, the Confederates could continue to supply their armies through Mobile City and the numerous railroads running from it to all parts of the South. After the fall of Port Hudson and Vicksburg, General Banks, in New Orleans, had at his disposal over 50,000 troops; and General Grant, at that time having in his mind the idea of sending Sherman on the celebrated march to the sea, had urgently requested the authorities at Washin