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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 0 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2 10 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 8 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 8 0 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 6 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 4 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 4 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 4 0 Browse Search
Raphael Semmes, Memoirs of Service Afloat During the War Between the States 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Liverpool (Mississippi, United States) or search for Liverpool (Mississippi, United States) in all documents.

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ral Lee's report. flag-ship Minnesota, Newport news, Va., December 21, 1863. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy: sir: In reference to the excessive running of the blockade off Wilmington, as reported in the rebel journals, and copied in our own, I beg leave to call your attention to the following extracts from private letters recently found on the prize steamer Ceres, which plainly show that all such statements are fictions: Captain Maffit, in a letter to Mr. Lamar, dated Liverpool, October, says: The news from blockade-runners is decidedly bad. Six of the last boats have recently been caught, among them the Advance and Eugenie. Nothing has entered Wilmington for the last month. The firm of William P. Campbell, of Bermuda, says, in a letter to their correspondents in Charleston, dated December second, 1863: It is very dull here. The only boats that came in from Wilmington this moon were the Flora and Gibraltar. Captain Ridgely, senior naval officer off Wilmin
nd Lieutenant Brewster handled the gun, sending to the gun boat for a new squad of men to work it, doing good execution. We had no idea of driving the enemy out of the town when we made the demonstration. We were expecting reinforcements from Liverpool; which had been sent for, and we wanted to keep them busy until they arrived. As soon as the enemy retreated out of the town, those attacking the fort gradually fell back, till out of cover of the bluffs, when they broke and ran, our boys hach cotton about being shipped. The enemy retired to the city and held it until reinforced. They were driven out of the city, which was recaptured, while stores were being destroyed. We have quite a number of prisoners. Our loss was about fifty killed and wounded. The enemy still occupy Yazoo City and Liverpool, intrenching at the latter place. Sherman issued a general order at Canton, in which he speaks of many regiments in his army entitled to furlough. L. Polk, Lieutenant-General.
ndicularly to the river, aid also a heavy force of infantry and cavalry behind a hill to the right of the battery, and running parallel to the river. On the second, we arrived at Sartalia, and at ten A. M. of the third we attacked the enemy at Liverpool, number about two thousand seven hundred men, under Ross, with two pieces of artillery. We silenced their guns, the army holding its position on the hills. At nightfall, the troops reembarked, and we dropped down for the night. The casualtiee advanced for another attack, but found the enemy had gone, leaving only a small force of about two hundred sharp-shooters to annoy us and the transports in passing. The wheel-houses of the sunken steamer Ivy are above water directly opposite Liverpool, and in the narrowest part of the river. To the right of her, however, there is plenty of water. The river is high and rising. I forgot to mention the land forces lost eight killed and twenty-two wounded in the attack of the third. We under