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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 183 183 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 34 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 20 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 16 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 15 1 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 14 0 Browse Search
John G. Nicolay, The Outbreak of Rebellion 14 0 Browse Search
Col. Robert White, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.2, West Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 12 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 9 1 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 9 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Laurel Hill, Va. (Virginia, United States) or search for Laurel Hill, Va. (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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, they would wait in Virginia and entice the Federalists into certain mysterious traps, where they would be destroyed to a man. There is great reliance placed on masked batteries in this war, and the country is favorable to their employment; but nothing can prove more completely the unsteady character of the troops than the reliance which is placed on the effects of such works, and, indeed, there is reason to think that there have been panics on both sides — at Great Bethel as well as at Laurel Hill. The telegraph is faster than the post, and all the lucubrations of to-day may be falsified by the deeds of to-morrow. The Senate and Congress are sitting in the Capitol within the very hearing of the guns, and the sight of the smoke of the conflict which is now raging in Virginia. Senators and Congressmen are engaged in disputations and speeches, while soldiers are working out the problem in their own way, and it is within the range of possibility that a disastrous battle may place
led Rich Mountain Camp, and the other towards Phillippa, Laurel Hill Camp, both under the general command of Gen. Garnett, of Virginia, though he remained at Laurel Hill, appointing Col. Pegram to command at Rich Mountain. Beverly, at the junction o news came that Gen. Garnett, who commands the rebels at Laurel Hill, was retreating with his whole force, six thousand men, mountain road leading back again to the western side of Laurel Hill, and across the mountains to the Shafer Fork of Cheat Riogne with which they had been so bountifully supplied at Laurel Hill, and in disgust they fled like a pack of frightened sheetains, (another range of the Alleghanies, from which the Laurel Hill range is a mere spur,) there was not a dry thread in ourhe country, and Gen. Morris in possession of his camp at Laurel Hill. There was little time left for delay. Our boys entehe army of Gen. Morris was to return, via St. George, to Laurel Hill, and go into camp. The three months men will soon retur
ious and numerous reports of the movements of the troops of General Garnett's command since I last wrote you, and I now merely write to give a true and accurate statement of the retreat and death of General Garnett--a statement which I defy any one to question, and to which those high in authority will willingly subscribe. I would have given you the particulars before, but having hard and severe duty to perform, I was not able to do so. We had been skirmishing with the enemy a week at Laurel Hill, when, on Thursday evening, 11th July, we received an order from Gen. Garnett to prepare provisions for a two days march, shortly after which we were directed to strike our tents, and took up our line of march for Beverly, a distance of sixteen miles, which place we came within three miles of, when we found that a very formidable blockade had been erected, which we could not pass, and, therefore, had to march back on the route we had previously come, to a road that led to the northeast, t