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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 104 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 81 7 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 34 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 31 31 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 30 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 24 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 7: Prisons and Hospitals. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 24 0 Browse Search
Heros von Borcke, Memoirs of the Confederate War for Independence 20 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 18 0 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 17 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Marye's Heights (Virginia, United States) or search for Marye's Heights (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), War Diary of Capt. Robert Emory Park, Twelfth Alabama Regiment. January 28th, 1863January 27th, 1864. (search)
, with horses and equipments entire attached. Captain McNeely, of Company F, was severely wounded in right leg, below the knee, by a grape shot tearing a hole through the flesh. Privates Chappell and Henderson were wounded in the arm. Chappell was engaged in a close, hand to hand encounter when wounded. The day's fight was a grand success for our arms. Our wagon train was moving all night to escape Stoneman's Yankee cavalry which were reported as ravaging the country, having taken Marye's Heights, and in search of our train. We passed a few miles beyond Bowling Green. May 3. The great battle continued to-day. Rodes' Brigade, to quote that officer's language, covered itself with glory. Generals Jackson and Stuart complimented it. Rodes was made a full Major General, and after the distressing news of Stonewall Jackson's wound, became senior officer on the field under General Lee. His modesty caused him to turn over the command to General J. E. B. Stuart of the cavalry, one
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.11 (search)
speak of the Confederate soldier, there rises before us the image of his antagonist, whom none that fought him would ever depreciate. He came at the call of his State, the earthly tribunal before which it was our faith all men should bow. He believed, and had been reared to believe, that the future of the Republic demanded but one flag between the seas. Not Pickett's charge at Gettysburg, nor Cleburne's at Franklin, outshone in vain but glorious valor, the lustre of the assault at Marye's Heights, and his mad charges at Spotsylvania and Cold Harbor. He had grander courage yet-he did not mock us at Appomattox. Had these men the power to control the peace, the Southern soldier had been spared the hardest of the trials that came to him with the end of armed hostilities. We are content in the home of our fathers. The Past asks what of the Future? We can answer as fearlessly as the dead answered the call on them—we are content in the home of our fathers. Neither fealty to