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William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 146 38 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 119 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 110 110 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 99 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 79 1 Browse Search
Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 58 2 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 44 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 44 0 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 43 1 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 40 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Meadow Mills (Virginia, United States) or search for Meadow Mills (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
halted for some hours. Meantime the Federals recovered from their surprise; their broken ranks were reformed upon the Sixth corps, which had preserved its organization; General Sheridan, who had been absent, came hurriedly up from Winchester, and exerted all his influence to allay the panic and reform his troops. When this was done, perceiving Early's small force and exposed situation, he attacked him in the afternoon, pierced his line, and soon had the Confederates in full retreat for Cedar Creek. Pressing them with his cavalry, he converted the retreat into a rout. The trains and artillery were jammed in the road, and fell into the hands of the Federals, and only the 1,500 prisoners he had taken was Early able to get off. Sheridan recaptured all the artillery he had lost, and a great deal more. The brilliant victory, which at mid-day had been Early's, was at nightfall Sheridan's. This was one of the most remarkable days in history, and the interest in it and discussion about i
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Shenandoah Valley in 1864, by George E. Pond—Campaigns of the civil war, XI. (search)
halted for some hours. Meantime the Federals recovered from their surprise; their broken ranks were reformed upon the Sixth corps, which had preserved its organization; General Sheridan, who had been absent, came hurriedly up from Winchester, and exerted all his influence to allay the panic and reform his troops. When this was done, perceiving Early's small force and exposed situation, he attacked him in the afternoon, pierced his line, and soon had the Confederates in full retreat for Cedar Creek. Pressing them with his cavalry, he converted the retreat into a rout. The trains and artillery were jammed in the road, and fell into the hands of the Federals, and only the 1,500 prisoners he had taken was Early able to get off. Sheridan recaptured all the artillery he had lost, and a great deal more. The brilliant victory, which at mid-day had been Early's, was at nightfall Sheridan's. This was one of the most remarkable days in history, and the interest in it and discussion about i
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of Conner's South Carolina brigade at Cedar Creek, October 19th, 1864. (search)
Report of Conner's South Carolina brigade at Cedar Creek, October 19th, 1864. By Major James M. Goggin. headquarters Conner's brigade, October 31st, 1864. Major,—I have the honor to report that on the 18th instant, at 11:45 P. M., this brigade, in pursuance of orders received during the afternoon, moved from its camp to the turnpike, in rear of Fisher's Hill. Soon after reaching there, the other brigades being put in motion, it fell into the position previously assigned it as the rear brigade of the division, and moved noiselessly and in good order to the north side of Cedar Creek, on the road——, where, just after daybreak, it rapidly formed in line of battle, and pushed forward at once in support of the other brigades of the division, then advancing on the enemy's position. On clearing the dense and tangled woods immediately in our front, and reaching the open, elevated ground occupied by the enemy (understood to be Crook's corps), it was discovered that Bryan's brigade<