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The subject was then passed by. Committee of the whole. The Convention went into Committee of the Whole (Mr. Southall in the chair,) for the purpose of considering the report of the Committee on Federal Relations--Mr. Montague, of Middlesex, being entitled to the floor. Mr. Fisher, of Northampton, asked the gentleman from Middlesex to give way for a moment, to enable him to correct the report of his speech in the official organ of the Convention, the Richmond Enquirer. This Middlesex to give way for a moment, to enable him to correct the report of his speech in the official organ of the Convention, the Richmond Enquirer. This having been done-- The Chairman requested the Secretary to read the 25th rule, prohibiting persons from walking about while a member was speaking. Mr. Montague resumed his remarks, and proceeded to argue in favor of the right of secession. The doctrine had been sneered at by gentlemen on this floor as ridiculous and absurd, and those who advocated it had been denounced as traitors. In his own remarks he intended to be courteous and respectful to all. He believed the day was not far
e no dishonor in saying to the North, we must have these guarantees, or disunion is the inevitable result. It may be said that this has already been done; but he apprehended it had not been done in the form and with the authority here proposed. He argued that the Federal Government ought, and might now with propriety acknowledge the independence of the Confederated States, and that it was an indispensable step towards a settlement of the difficulty. He agreed with the gentleman from Middlesex, that the condition of the Confederated States was not to be disturbed by force. He held that the Committee ought to agree upon something that would speedily settle the pending difficulty, taking care to demand enough to meet the exigencies of the case.--He spoke highly of the resources of the Southern Confederacy, and the gallantry of her people, but must be permitted to say that he thought she acted with rather too much haste in going off without consulting with her Southern sisters. H