Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Mine Run (Virginia, United States) or search for Mine Run (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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he turnpike. The Sixth corps, General Sedgwick, moved up and took position to the right of the Second corps, at daylight. At sunrise, the First, Second, and Sixth corps proceeded in line of battle simultaneously, but, to their great chagrin, they found the fleet-footed enemy had decamped during the night. By constant and rapid marching, our advance overtook their retreating rear-guard, and shortly after discovered the main body of the rebel army in a strong position on the west bank of Mine Run, which. is about one and three quarter miles from Robertson's Tavern. Quite a number of deserters were picked up by our advance, and from them we learned that Hill's corps (rebel) had advanced from Orange Court-House down the plank-road, and there united with Ewell's corps, thereby concentrating the whole of Lee's army in a position naturally strong, and with formidable intrenchments to protect him. To add to our numerous disadvantages, a heavy rain-storm set in early in the forenoon
y of Culpeper Ford on Saturday night, to await further orders, and was there directed to return to camp, which he did the next day. On recrossing, Major White, with one battalion, was sent up the river, for the purpose of capturing any pickets which might be stationed at the upper fords. He recrossed the river at Jacob's Mills, where four or five videttes were taken prisoners. General Kilpatrick's reconnoissance conclusively proves that no force of the enemy occupies the country east of Mine Run. The small parties of cavalry all belonged to Hampton's Legion, which is stationed at Fredericksburgh. More than half the videttes have no horses, are seldom relieved, and are sometimes obliged to walk twenty-three miles to their post of duty. The rebels are represented as being engaged in replanking the road from Chancellorsville to Orange Court-House, and are laying out several new roads through the wilderness. Twelve or fifteen prisoners were captured by General Kilpatrick, and he