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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 200 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 180 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 158 42 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 120 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 1 100 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 96 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 74 2 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 72 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 65 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 49 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Missionary Ridge, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) or search for Missionary Ridge, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 22 results in 8 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
guard, where the main road passes through Missionary ridge. He had availed himself of the night to ion marched to reinforce General Bragg at Missionary Ridge. On the 12th, twenty-seven men were tran then encamped across Lookout Creek, near Missionary Ridge. On the morning of the 23d of Novembert Mountain followed and Bragg withdrew to Missionary Ridge. Early the following morning Johnston'will. T. Martin. Lookout Mountain and Missionary Ridge. Report of General Braxton Bragg. and drove in our picket line in front of Missionary Ridge, but made no further effort. On Tuesdaharged in the above report as breaking at Missionary Ridge, we append the following extract from an * I have always believed our disaster at Missionary Ridge was due immediately to the misconduct of , and Chickamauga's victory led us but to Missionary Ridge. Dissensions and rivalries have brought est came Jackson, Miss., Chickamauga, and Missionary Ridge. In Virginia the battalion was doing b
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The battle of Chickamauga. (search)
our whole line of skirmishers to the front, and I moved to the left and extended these orders. All the cavalry at hand, including my personal guard, were ordered to the front. Members of my staff, in passing through the lines of our left wing with their escort, were warned of danger, and told that they were entering on the neutral ground between us and the enemy. But this proved to be an error, and our cavalry soon came upon the enemy's rear guard, where the main road passes through Missionary ridge. He had availed himself of the night to withdraw from our front, and his main body was already in position within his lines at Chattanooga. Any immediate pursuit by our infantry and artillery would have been fruitless, as it was not deemed practicable, with our weak and exhausted forces, to assail the enemy, now more than double our numbers, behind his entrenchments. Though we had defeated him and driven him from the field with heavy loss in men, arms and artillery, it had only been
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of Third battery of Maryland Artillery. (search)
ered to Sweet Water, East Tennessee, to rejoin Stevenson's division; whence, on the 5th of November, the whole division marched to reinforce General Bragg at Missionary Ridge. On the 12th, twenty-seven men were transferred to the battery from the Fortieth, Forty-first, Forty-third, Fifty-second and Fifty-sixth Georgia regiments t battery encamped at the foot of Lookout Mountain on the 13th, and on the 23d joined Johnston's battalion, which was then encamped across Lookout Creek, near Missionary Ridge. On the morning of the 23d of November, the enemy, under cover of a heavy fog, moved up and attacked the left wing of General Bragg's army, at the foot ofn, and drove it back rapidly, the line at that point being weak and the attack unexpected. The evacuation of Lookout Mountain followed and Bragg withdrew to Missionary Ridge. Early the following morning Johnston's battalion was ordered to the extreme right of the Confederate line, and reached the position assigned it at 2 o'cl
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Lookout Mountain and Missionary Ridge. (search)
Lookout Mountain and Missionary Ridge. Report of General Braxton Bragg. headquarters Army of Tennessee, Dalton, 30th November, 1863. General S. Cooper, Adjutant and Inspector General, Richmond: Sir,—On Monday the 23rd, the enemy advanced in heavy force and drove in our picket line in front of Missionary Ridge, but made no further effort. On Tuesday morning early, they threw over the river a heavy force opposite the north end of the ridge and just below the mouth of Chickamauga,anding. Note.—As a matter of justice to General Anderson's Division, charged in the above report as breaking at Missionary Ridge, we append the following extract from an autograph letter of General Bragg to Major E. T. Sykes, of Columbus, Mississippi, dated Mobile, 8th of February, 1873: * * * * I have always believed our disaster at Missionary Ridge was due immediately to the misconduct of a brigade of Buckner's troops from East Tennessee, commanded by Brigadier-General Alex. W. Reynolds,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Washington Artillery in the Army of Tennessee. (search)
e day till Liddell can be brought up and Graves has fallen in our midst, and bending over him, Breckinridge laments his loss. Around him lie Brocard and Bayle, and Reichert, and Duggan, and Stakeman, and Greenwood and Woods, with shattered carriages and crushed guns that show what fire we took unflinchingly, while pouring canister alone upon their charging lines. Breckinridge thanks us on the field. To replace Blair, Vaught now stands promoted, and Chickamauga's victory led us but to Missionary Ridge. Dissensions and rivalries have brought defeat. The Fifth, unmoved, indignant and devoted, their battery sacrificed, seized the first guns abandoned in their rear, and with Austin's help check the enemy and save the bridge. Joe Johnston comes, and Dalton's cantonments ring with joy. With spring, Sherman attempts the portals of the pass, and Rocky-face and Buzzard's Roost repell him to Snake Gap. Resaca finds us in the thickest fray, and on that hill from which were borne Simmons a
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Washington Artillery. (search)
r the tide. The fern on the hill-sides was splashed with blood, And down in the corn where poppies grew, Were redder stains than the poppies knew; And crimson-dyed was the rivers' flood. Murfreesboro and Stone river followed in quick succession. In Virginia the four companies participated at Chancellorsville, and at Gettysburg, Pa., were honored by being chosen to fire the two signal guns that opened the great battle of July 3. In the West came Jackson, Miss., Chickamauga, and Missionary Ridge. In Virginia the battalion was doing brave work. The Russian Field Marshal Suwarrow once sent word to the Austrian Archduke Charles, I know nothing of defensive warfare; I only know how to attack. The Washington Artillery could not say they knew nothing of defensive warfare, but certainly it was always more to their inclination to take the aggressive, and at Drewry's Bluff Suwarrow's tactics of Stupay, Ibey (advance and strike), was the order of the day, and with his army badly b
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of Major-General S. B. Buckner of the battle of Chickamauga. (search)
n the heavy wood between Poe's and Kelly's fields. As the enemy's right had been beaten back, it had, by a conversion on this angle of their work as a pivot, been gradually driven to assume a position also at right angles to the road, his right resting on a chain of heights beginning near Snodgrass's house, about a fourth of a mile west of Kelly's house, on the road, and extending westward about one mile to the Crawfish road. These heights constitute the southern spurs which terminate Missionary Ridge—are covered with open woods—have a gentle but irregular slope on the south, the north and the east, and their summits are fully a hundred feet above the level of the surrounding country. A little after four o'clock P. M., under instructions from the Lieutenant-General commanding, I ordered Preston, with Gracie's and Kelly's brigades, to support Kershaw's brigade in the attack on the heights near Snodgrass's house, sustaining him afterwards by Trigg's brigade, under the able direction o
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 78 (search)
elay been obviated by proper instructions to his skirmish line and due notification to the troops in his front of his approaching columns. Enemy's retreat to Chattanooga. On the morning of the 21st September, the enemy having the night previous commenced his retreat to Chattanooga, See the official report of the battle, p. 24. Bragg moved rapidly forward, preceded by General Forrest and his troopers, who were sorely pressing and harrassing the retreating foe, that night reached Missionary Ridge and commenced fortifying. As to the results and consequences of this battle, read the concluding part of General Bragg's report. All the passes of Lookout Mountain, which had been in possession of the enemy since our abandonment of Chattanooga during the month previous, and which covered his line of supplies from Bridgeport, were now regained by us. Wheeler's cavalry sent to enemy's rear. To cut off their supplies and force them, if possible, to evacuate Chattanooga, Wheeler wi