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Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865 583 9 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 520 4 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 354 138 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 297 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 260 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 226 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 203 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 160 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 137 137 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 129 37 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 5: Forts and Artillery. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for Morris Island (South Carolina, United States) or search for Morris Island (South Carolina, United States) in all documents.

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on land as that of the ironclad vessel on the sea. The photographs in this volume follow the artillery in the field, both Federal and Confederate. They comprehensively illustrate the precaution taken by the Federal engineers to protect the Northern capital from capture. They supplement graphically the technical information in regard to the fabrication of guns and making of ammunition. A dramatic series of views follows the gradual reduction of the Confederate forts and batteries on Morris Island by the Federal besiegers, and the latter's attempts against Sumter. The photographs in the latter part of the volume reflect the ingenuity of the American soldier in protecting himself on the battlefield; the bridging of broad rivers in the space of an hour by the Engineer Corps; the expert railroading under difficulties of the United States Military Railroad Construction Corps; the Confederate defenses along the James which baffled the Federal army, and preserved Richmond so long fre
ion of Battery Wagner, at the north end of Morris Island before Charleston, by a series of parallel on the left, that is, across a creek from Morris Island proper. Battery Hays was begun on July 15e working their way to the northern end of Morris Island. Battery Reynolds, on the first paralecond parallel Battery Rosecrans on Morris Island in August, 1863. It was not the burstinscribes dodging shells in the parallels on Morris Island in August, 1863: The fire from Wagner, altbattery Rosecrans-life in the parallels on Morris Island in August, 1863. The 100-Pounder Parrotts in battery Rosecrans Morris Island in summer 1863. At ten o'clock on the night of July allel, toward Battery Wagner at the end of Morris Island, until the final flying — sap took them up of the Confederacy, in Fort Moultrie Fort Wagner and Fort Gregg. These two forts were caply in the slow approach by parallels along Morris Island, preceding the evacuation of Charleston. [2 more...]
Artillery became known as Henry's Battery from the name of its young commander, Lieutenant Guy V. Henry (afterward a brigadier-general; later still a conspicuous figure in the Spanish-American War). it took part in the siege operations against Forts Wagner and Gregg on Morris Island, and against Sumter and Charleston, from July to September, 1863. bronze had been adopted as a standard metal for field guns in 1841, and many of the field batteries were equipped with bronze 12-pounder napoleons. Morris Island, and against Sumter and Charleston, from July to September, 1863. bronze had been adopted as a standard metal for field guns in 1841, and many of the field batteries were equipped with bronze 12-pounder napoleons. The metal proved too soft to stand the additional wear on rifled guns, however, and it was then found that wrought iron served the purpose best. Later forged steel proved more satisfactory for breech loaders. Light field guns — a piece of Henry's Battery, before Sumter in 1863 After the attempt on Sumter-third New York Light artillery Napoleon gun in battery no. 2, Fort Whipple: peace at the defenses of Washington The lush, waving grass beautifies this Union fort, one of the fines
ield-gun on the top of the parapet weighed ten pounds, and the powder charge was one pound. Shells in Fort Putnam South Carolina: projectiles in the sea-coast forts Projectiles in Magruder battery, Yorktown Interior of Fort Johnson, Morris island Interior of Fort Putnam, Morris island struck, thereby communicating the flame to the bursting charge. Of course, these were not always sure. Whether the one or the other form of fuse was used, depended on the purpose of the firing. IMorris island struck, thereby communicating the flame to the bursting charge. Of course, these were not always sure. Whether the one or the other form of fuse was used, depended on the purpose of the firing. If against troops, it was desirable to cause the shell to burst in their midst, and not to allow it to penetrate the ground. If desired for the destruction of earthworks or magazines, it had to be exploded after the penetration. In the former case the time-fuse, and in the latter the percussion-fuse was used. At Fort Scott, near Washington, in October, 1863, an experiment was tried to test the value of spherical case-shot when fired from mortars. The 10-inch shell was filled with 12-pound
superior to any rigid substance. The ruins of Fort Pulaski taught the Confederates how to defend Fort Sumterwhich was evacuated but never fell. In General Gillmore's Report on Charleston he says: One hundred and ten thousand six hundred and forty-three pounds of metal produced a breach in Fort Pulaski which caused the surrender of that permanent and well constructed brick fortification, while one hundred and twenty-two thousand and thirty pounds of metal failed to open the bomb-proof of Fort Wagner, a sand work extemporized for the war.... It must not be forgotten, in this connection, that in the former case the brick wall stood nearly vertical, and all the debris formed by the shots immediately fell into the ditch, and no longer afforded any protection to the wall left standing; while in the latter the mass was so formed that a large proportion of the sand displaced fell back and again within an area attempted to be breached. Fort Pulaski--the angle where the federals concentr