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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 4 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 2 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: February 28, 1862., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 18, 1862., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for Mud River (Georgia, United States) or search for Mud River (Georgia, United States) in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 9: operations of Admiral Dupont's squadron in the sounds of South Carolina. (search)
heir passage down to Fort Pulaski, and afterwards passed up the river again to Savannah, where one of them sunk at the dock. As a demonstration the appearance of the gun-boats was a success, as Savannah was thrown into a great state of excitement, and all the energies of the people were put forth to increase the military defences. The information required by this expedition was gained without loss of life or injury to the gun-boats. Surveys and examinations were made up Wright and Mud Rivers by Commander John Rodgers, and a great amount of good service done. The officers and boats' crews were in continual danger from the fire of bush-whacking Confederates, who were always ready for a fight. The names of Commanders John Rodgers, Drayton, C. R. P. Rodgers, Godon, Rhind, Stevens, Balch, Ammen, Truxton, Watmough, and Semmes, were conspicuous wherever a Confederate shot was heard, or wherever there was a chance to gain a point on the enemy. Heavy knocks were received by our