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J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 22 (search)
aid that Confederate bonds are bringing quite as much in New York as in Richmond; and that the bonds of Southern men are freely discounted in the North. These, if true, are indications of approaching peace. Cotton at 50 cents per pound, and our capacity to produce five million bales per annum, must dazzle the calculating Yankees. A single crop worth $1,000,000, 0001 What interest or department of industry in the United States can promise such results? Letters were received to-day from Nassau, dated 12th December. Mr. L. Heyliger, our agent, reports a number of steamers sailing, and about to sail, with large amounts of stores and goods of all kinds, besides plates for our navy. A Mr. Wiggs has several steamers engaged in this business. Our government own some, and private individuals (foreign speculators) are largely engaged in the trade. Most of these steamers run sixteen miles an hour. A Mr. Hart, agent for S. Isaac Campbell & Co., London, proposes to clothe and equip 100
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 27 (search)
ites from Petersburg that the movements of cars with ammunition, etc. are thrown into confusion by the neglect of telegraph agents in giving timely notice. This is an unfortunate time for confusion. I sent the letter to the Secretary, and know that it was not filed on the way to him. A communication came in to-day from the Committee of Safety at Mobile, Ala., charging that J. S. Clark, Wm. G. Ford, and -- Hurt, have been shipping cotton to New Orleans, after pretending to clear it for Nassau. It says Mr. Clarke was an intimate crony of Gen. Butler's speculating brother. It also intimates that the people believe the government here winks at these violations of the act of Congress of April, 1862. Very curiously, a letter came from the Assistant Secretary's room to-day for file, which was written April 22d, 1861, by R. H. Smith to Judge Campbell--a private letter-warning him not to come to Mobile, as nothing was thought of but secession, and it was believed Judge C. had used
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, XXVII. June, 1863 (search)
rder was received from Gen. Arnold Elzey to fall back toward the city, pickets and all. A letter from Gen. Holmes, containing an account from one of his scouts, shows that the enemy's militia in Arkansas and Missouri are putting to death all the men, young or old, having favored the Confederate cause, who fall into their hands. These acts are perpetrated by order of Gen. Prentiss. The President suggests that they be published, both at home and abroad. Mr. L. Heyliger, our agent at Nassau, sends an account of the firing into and disabling the British steamer Margaret and Jessee by the United States steamer Rhode Island, within a half mile of shore. Several British subjects were wounded. This may make trouble. Mr. J. S. Lemmon applied by letter to-day for permission to leave a Confederate port for Europe. Major-Gen. Arnold Elzey indorsed on it: This young man, being a native of Maryland, is not liable to military service in the Confederate States. Well, Arnold Elzey is
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, XXIX. August, 1863 (search)
Mrs. ex-President Tyler, who has already been permitted to visit her native State, New York, once or twice during the warand indeed her plantation has been within the enemy's lines-has applied for passage in a government steamer (the Lee) to Nassau, and to take with her a few bales of cotton. I suppose it will be allowed. We have fine hot August weather now, and I hope my tomatoes will mature, and thus save me two dollars per day. My potatoes have, so far, failed; but as they are still ry of the Treasury, censuring the commissary agents in Georgia, who are sent thither from other States, who insult the farmers and encourage speculation. Mr. Memminger is shipping gold from Wilmington, $20,000 by each steamer, to Bermuda and Nassau. Why is this? Cotton is quite as good as gold, and there are thousands of millions worth of that in the country, which Mr. Memminger might buy, certainly might have bought for Confederate notes, but, in his peculiar wisdom, he would not. And no
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, XXX. September, 1863 (search)
to institute inquiries, etc. S. Wyatt, Augusta, Ga., writes in favor of appeals to the patriotism of the people to counteract what Mr. Toombs has done. What has he done? But he advises the President, to whom he professes to be very friendly, to order a discontinuance of seizures, etc. A. Cohen (Jew name), purser of the blockade-running steamer Arabia at Wilmington, has submitted a notable scheme to Gen. Winder, who submits it to the Secretary of War, establishing a police agency at Nassau. Gen. W. to send some of his detectives thither to examine persons coming into the Confederate States, and if found all right, to give them passports. It was only yesterday that a letter was received from Gen. Whiting, asking authority to send out a secret agent on the Arabia, to see what disposition would be made of her cargo, having strong suspicions of the loyalty of the owners and officers of that vessel. Gov. Z. B. Vance complains indignantly of Marylanders and Virginians appointed
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 32 (search)
ord be brought to the notice of the Secretary! It is all wrong, and if the business be not better regulated or terminated, it will terminate the government. Gen. Lee's reputation as a great captain will be ruined, if the blockaderun-ners be allowed to continue to give information to the enemy of all his movements. October 22 Gen. Wheeler has taken 700 of the enemy's cavalry in East Tennessee, 6 cannon, 50 wagons, commissary stores, etc. Per contra, the steamer Venus, with bacon, from Nassau, got aground trying to enter the port of Wilmington, and ship and cargo were lost. There is a rumor that Gen. Taylor, transMis-sissippi, has captured Gen. Banks, his staff, and sixteen regiments. This, I fear, is not well authenticated. A poor woman yesterday applied to a merchant in Carey Street to purchase a barrel of flour. The price he demanded was $70. My God! exclaimed she, how can I pay such prices? I have seven children; what shall I do? I don't know, madam, said he,
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, XXXII. November, 1863 (search)
y, and Missouri? November 12 No accounts of any fighting, but plenty of battles looked for. A. A. Little writes to the Secretary of War from Fredericksburg, that the attempt to remove the iron from the Aquia Railroad by the government having failed, now is the time for private enterprise to effect it. If the Secretary will say the word, it can be done. He says the iron is worth millions, its weight in gold! Will Mr. Seddon let it be saved? Yes, indeed. Mr. Heyliger, agent at Nassau, writes on the 3d instant (just a week ago), that he is shipping bacon by every steamer (three or four per week), leather, percussion caps, and a large amount of /quartermaster's stores. But the supply of lead and saltpeter is exhausted, and he hopes the agents in Europe will soon send more. About one in every four steamers is captured by the enemy. We can afford that. The President sent over to-day, for the perusal of the Secretary of War, a long letter from Gen. Howell Cobb, dated a
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 35 (search)
eal and potatoes, will keep us alive a month at least. The rich rogues and rascals, however, in the city, are living sumptuously, and spending Confederate States notes as if they supposed they would soon be valueless. January 10 Letters from Governor Vance received to-day show that he has been making extensive arrangements to clothe and subsist North Carolina troops. His agents have purchased abroad some 40,000 blankets, as many shoes, bacon, etc., most of which is now at Bermuda and Nassau. He has also purchased an interest in several steamers; but, it appears, a recent regulation of the Confederate States Government forbids the import and export of goods except, almost exclusively, for the government itself. The governor desires to know if his State is to be put on the same footing with private speculators. He also demands some thousands of bales of cotton, loaned the government-and which the government cannot now replace at Wilmington-and his complaints against the gov
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, XXXV. February, 1864 (search)
s carried on a successful and profitable trade in jewelry in the City of Richmond, disposed of his effects with a view of quitting the Confederacy and finding a home in some land where his services were less likely to be required in the tented field. Having settled up his business affairs to his own satisfaction, he applied for and obtained a passport from the Assistant Secretary of War, to enable him to pass our lines. He first took the Southern route, hoping to run out from Wilmington to Nassau; but delays occurring, he returned to Richmond. From this point he went to Staunton, determined to make his exit from the country by the Valley route. All went on smoothly enough until he had passed Woodstock, in Shenandoah County. Between that point and Strasburg he was attacked by a band of robbers and stripped of everything he possessed of value, embracing a heavy amount of money and a large and valuable assortment of jewelry. We have heard his loss estimated at from $175,000 to $200,
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 46 (search)
er cord. I saw Gen. Rains to-day. He says he has over 2000 shell torpedoes planted along our lines around Richmond and Petersburg. Col. Bayne reports the importation of 6400 packages salted meats, fish, coffee, preserved vegetables, from Nassau, Bermuda, and Halifax, since October 1st, 1864, in fourteen different steamers. December 8 Rained hard in the night; clear and pleasant in the morning. A letter from John T. Bourne, St. Georges, Bermuda, says he has some 1800 barrels goe benefit of private individuals-speculators. I drew my (State) salt to-day, 70 pounds, for 7 in family-20 cents per pound. It retails at a $1 per pound! Mr. Secretary--has sent (per Lieut.-Col. Bayne) some gold to Wilmington, to buy (in Nassau) loaf sugar for his family, to be brought in government steamers. My son Thomas could get no beef ration to-day-too scarce. December 21 Raining; rained all night. The following dispatch was received this morning: Wilmington, D
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