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C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 16 0 Browse Search
Epictetus, Works (ed. George Long) 14 0 Browse Search
Epictetus, Works (ed. Thomas Wentworth Higginson) 12 0 Browse Search
Cornelius Tacitus, The Annals (ed. Alfred John Church, William Jackson Brodribb) 10 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 10 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 6 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 6 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 6 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 4 0 Browse Search
Cornelius Tacitus, A Dialogue on Oratory (ed. Alfred John Church, William Jackson Brodribb) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Epictetus, Works (ed. Thomas Wentworth Higginson). You can also browse the collection for Nero (Ohio, United States) or search for Nero (Ohio, United States) in all documents.

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Epictetus, Discourses (ed. Thomas Wentworth Higginson), book 1 (search)
e the only one to lose my head? Why, would you have all the world, then, lose their heads for your consolation? Why are not you willing to stretch out your neck, like Lateranus,Plautius Lateranus, a consul elect, was put to death by the command of Nero, for being privy to the conspiracy of Piso. His execution was so sudden that he was not permitted to take leave of his wife and children, but was hurried into a place appropriated to the punishment of slaves, and there killed by the hand of the trim? " If you prefer it as a heavier misfortune, how foolish a preference ! If as a lighter, who has put it in your power? Why do you not study to be contented with what is allotted you?" Well, and what said Agrippinus Agrippinus was banished by Nero, for no other crime than the unfortunate death of his father, who had been causelessly killed by the command of Tiberius; and this had furnished a pretence for accusing him of hereditary disloyalty. Tacitus, Ann. 10.1 c. 28, 29. - C. upon this acc
Epictetus, Discourses (ed. Thomas Wentworth Higginson), book 1 (search)
do this menial office or not, I will tell you it is a pleasanter thing to get a dinner than not, and a greater disgrace to be whipt than not to be whipt; so that, if you measure yourself by these things, go and do your office. " Ay, but this is not suitable to my character." It is you who are to consider that, not I; for it is you who know yourself, what value you set upon yourself, and at what rate you sell yourself; for different people sell themselves at different prices. Hence Agrippinus,Nero was remarkably fond of theatrical entertainments, and used to introduce upon the stage the descendants of noble families, whom want had rendered venal. Tacitus, Ann. 14. c. 14.- C. when Florus was deliberating whether he should go to Nero's shows, and perform some part in them himself, bid him go. "But why do not you go, then? " says Florus. " Because," re- plied Agrippinus, " I do not deliberate about it." For he who once sets himself about such considerations, and goes to calculating the
Epictetus, Discourses (ed. Thomas Wentworth Higginson), book 1 (search)
ll not live there. " Nor at Athens." Well, nor at Athens. " Nor at Rome." Nor at Rome. "But you shall live at Gyaros."An island in the Aegean Sea, to which the Romans used to banish criminals. -C. I will live there. But suppose that living at Gyaros seems to me like living in a great smoke. I can then retire where no one can forbid me to live, for it is an abode open to all, and put off my last garment, this poor body of mine; beyond this, no one has any power over me. Thus Demetrius said to Nero: "You sentence me to death; and Nature you." If I prize my body first, I have surrendered myself as a slave; if my estate, the same; for I at once betray where I am vulnerable. Just as when a reptile pulls in his head, I bid you strike that part of him which he guards; and be you assured, that wherever you show a desire to guard yourself. there your master will attack you. Remember but this, and whom will you any longer flatter or fear? "But I want to sit where the senators do." Do not you se
Epictetus, Discourses (ed. Thomas Wentworth Higginson), book 3 (search)
their life is. It is not in power; for otherwise, they who have been twice and thrice consuls must be happy; but they are not. To whom shall we give heed in these things, - to you who look only upon the externals of their condition, and are dazzled by appearances, or to themselves? What do they say? Hear them when they groan, when they sigh, when they pronounce themselves the more wretched and in more danger from these very consulships, this glory and splendor. It is not in empire; otherwise Nero and Sardanapalus had been happy. But not even Agamemnon was happy, though a better man than Sardanapalus or Nero. But when others sleep soundly, what is he doing? Forth by the roots he rends his hairs. Homer, Iliad, 10.15; 91-5.- H. And what does he himself say? "I wander bewildered; my heart leaps forth from my bosom." Why, which of your affairs goes ill, poor wretch, your possessions? No. Your body? No. But you have gold and brass in abundance. What then goes ill? That part of you is neglec
Epictetus, Discourses (ed. Thomas Wentworth Higginson), book 4 (search)
is own; not his paternal possessions, his paltry estate or his house, his lodging or his slaves, for none of these are a man's own; but all these belong to others, are servile, dependent, and very variously assigned by the disposers of them. But his personal qualifications as a man, the impressions which he brought into the world stamped upon his mind; such as we look for in money, accepting or rejecting it accordingly. "What impression has this piece of money? " "Trajan's." "Give it me." " Nero's." Nero being declared an enemy by the Senate, his coin was, in consequence of this, prohibited and destroyed. -C. Throw it away. It is false; it is good for nothing. So in the other case. "What stamp have his principles?" "Gentleness, social affection, patience, good-nature." Bring them hither. I receive them. I make such a man a citizen; I receive him for a neighbor, a fellow-traveller. Only see that he have not the Neronian stamp. Is he passionate? Is he resentful? Is he querulous? Wou