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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for New Creek (West Virginia, United States) or search for New Creek (West Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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ough the Mill Creek Valley — a good, loyal neighborhood, and the homes of Captain Ault's Swamp Rangers. We now felt that we were among friends; and from here to New-Creek there is a large proportion of Union men. We arrived at Petersburgh, and enjoyed a two days rest. This morning McNeil and White, with three hundred guerrillas, attacked a train of ninety wagons, which were on the way from New-Creek to Petersburgh. They killed two of the guards, wounded five, pillaged seven wagons and burned five, and captured two hundred horses. It was a bold, daring act; but the train was some two miles in length, and a guard of only seventy-five men to protect it are bitter secesh. But we found corn and hay in abundance, and that was what our horses needed, so we used it. The morning of the seventeenth we started for New-Creek, where we arrived in the afternoon, and where our ears were gladdened by the music of the steam-whistles on the locomotives of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad.
horse, his servant, and a number of his maps of fifteen or twenty counties, in which nearly every house was put down, and, in numerous instances, the occupants of the houses given. Jackson also captured a number of mules and wagons. Jackson's loss was small. Another account. To the Editor of the Richmond Examiner: The raid is over. Averill has gone, not up the spout, but back into his den. Cast your eye upon a map, and I'll tell you how he went and how he came. He came from New-Creek, a depot on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, in the county of Hardy, along the eastern base of the Shenandoah Mountains, through Covington to Salem, burnt things generally, and returned over nearly the same route. Imboden seized the gap where the Parkersburgh turnpike crosses the Shenandoah, and prevented a raid on Staunton. Averill left five hundred men to hold Imboden there, and pushed on toward Salem. That General could not pursue without uncovering Staunton, the force threatening ne
sent his cattle and disabled men toward Romney, and with the rest of his command, now reduced to little over four hundred men, proceeded toward Ridgeville, where he encamped. The next morning, at four o'clock, we took up the line of march for New-Creek, but by the time we reached the top of Nobby Mountain, within seven miles of New-Creek, the weather became so intolerable that we turned back, and coming on through Romney, thence through gorges and over mountains of ice, toiling for several daNew-Creek, the weather became so intolerable that we turned back, and coming on through Romney, thence through gorges and over mountains of ice, toiling for several days, we reached the valley. The object of the expedition was, I believe, to get cattle. Six hundred of these and about three hundred horses, thirty wagons, and three hundred and twenty mules — not to mention about one hundred Yankees — were the fruits of this expedition. When it is remembered what natural obstacles were encountered and overcome, what a Siberian icebergian spell of weather reigned during the whole trip, it will be a matter of surprise that the trip was made at all, without c
lf-way reconnaissance. The next reliable information we had of the enemy's movements was when Rosser suddenly attacked one of our trains while on its way from New-Creek to Petersburgh. It is now known to be a fact that the eight hundred men sent as a guard with the train were disgracefully remiss in the discharge of their duty.gh, etc., to reach the Romney region at the expected time. As soon as it was known the railroad had been cut, Colonel Mulligan's forces moved forward from the New-Creek region and attacked the enemy. We were successful in making the enemy fall back. Our movements toward the enemy's rear of course hastened his departure from a defeated Early's designs, which were to seriously injure the line of the railroad and capture the garrison at Petersburgh. He has been defeated in getting into New-Creek or Cumberland, failed to interrupt the running of the railroad trains beyond a few hours, and failed to get off with any large portion of his prisoners or plunde