hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 29 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 22 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 18 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 18 0 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 16 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 0 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 8 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 19, 1863., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 6 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Newmarket, Va. (Virginia, United States) or search for Newmarket, Va. (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

Doc. 41.-raid in Hardy County, Virginia. Richmond Enquirer account. camp near Newmarket, January 9, 1864. we have just returned from a ten days raid behind the enemy's lines. Our force consisted of a portion of Fitz Lee's cavalry division, under General Chambliss, and Rosser's brigade, under General Rosser--all under the command of Fitz Lee. Fitz Lee's division had already been reduced by his pertinacious but ineffectual efforts to capture Averill, to but a moiety of his proper number; while Rosser's brigade had just achieved a successful tour around Meade's army, and, as a matter of course, was greatly diminished. We started with about one thousand one hundred men in all. It was raining when we started, and soon commenced snowing. Many consoled themselves for such an inauspicious beginning with the old adage that a bad beginning makes a good end. We hoped against hope, and kept up light hearts, though at every step the weather and the roads got worse. As we ente
the progress of the rebels for that day. There they remained, until Colonel Garrard, with his splendid regiment, dismounted, advanced, and occupied the ground. The regiment was then, by order of Colonel Garrard, posted on the crest of the hill next in rear, where it was relieved near midnight by the Fifteenth Wisconsin. The stubborn fighting of the infantry alone saved the town from capture, and, perhaps, the entire command from defeat, for preparations for retreat had been going on all day, and the troops engaged were not reenforced for fear of bringing on a general engagement, for which we were not ready. The retreat was made over two routes, our forces falling back across the Holston to Strawberry Plains. Newmarket was occupied by the rebels yesterday. The forces here are ready for any emergency, and expect an attack from Longstreet, who has been heavily reenforced. Still, if the enemy is as strong as reported, you need not be surprised to hear of us next at Knoxville.