Browsing named entities in Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States.. You can also browse the collection for Island Number Ten (Missouri, United States) or search for Island Number Ten (Missouri, United States) in all documents.

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fenses. Missouri and Arkansas were added to his department, but he was unable to avail himself of these increased powers, as the defense of the Mississippi was his main object, and occupied all his resources. Dr. Polk says : Finding in Island No.10 a most advantageous position, works were begun there. His design now was to make that the advanced point of defense-holding Fort Pillow as a position to fall back upon, in the event he was driven to it. With those two points thoroughly fortif thoroughly fortified. The lines in the rear, covering the batteries commanding the river, were to be so constructed as to permit of their being held by a fraction of his force, the larger portion remaining free to operate in the open field. Island No.10 was to be fortified as a reserve to Columbus; New Madrid to be fortified, so as to prevent the enemy getting possession of the Missouri shore at that point, and thus obstructing river navigation below No. 10; while Fort Pillow was to form the
s assembled volunteers at the most assailable points on her borders, and took measures for guarding the water-entrances to her territory. All the strong points on the Mississippi were occupied and fortified-Memphis, Randolph, Fort Pillow, and Island No.10. The last-named place, though a low-lying island, was believed to be a very strong position. Captain Gray, the engineer in charge when General Johnston assumed command (September 18th), reported that Island No.10 was one of the finest strateIsland No.10 was one of the finest strategic positions in the Mississippi Valley, and, properly fortified, would offer the greatest resistance to the enemy; and that its intrenchments could not be taken by a force four or five times superior in number. It is not necessary here to enter upon a narrative of the defenses of the Mississippi River. Columbus was relied upon as the chief barrier against invasion; and was found sufficient, until, for strategic reasons, it was deemed expedient to abandon it. The defense of the points lower do
ve a line of retreat to the latter place or to Grenada, Mississippi, and, if necessary, to Jackson, Mississippi. At Columbus, Kentucky, will be left only a sufficient garrison for the defense of the works there, assisted by Hollins's gunboats, for the purpose of making a desperate defense of the river at that point. A sufficient number of transports will be kept near that place for the removal of the garrison therefrom, when no longer tenable in the opinion of the commanding officer. Island No.10 and Fort Pillow will likewise be defended to the last extremity, aided also by Hollins's gunboats, which will then retire to the vicinity of Memphis, where another bold stand will be made. (Signed) G. T. Beauregard, General C. S. A. (Signed) W. J. Hardee, Major-General. A true copy: S. W. Ferguson, Lieutenant and Aide-de-Camp. This plan of campaign embraced the defense of the line of the Cumberland, if possible; or, if not, then a retreat to Stevenson. Beauregard was to fall back
st be properly guarded from Iuka to Tuscumbia, and even to Decatur, if practicable. Columbus must either be left to be defended to the last extremity by its proper garrison, assisted by Hollins's fleet of gunboats, and provided with provisions and ammunition for several months, or abandoned altogether, its armament and garrison being transferred if practicable to Fort Pillow, which, I am informed, is a naturally and artificially strong position, about one hundred miles above Memphis. Island No.10, near New Madrid, could also be held by its garrison, assisted by Hollins's fleet, until the possession of New Madrid by the enemy would compel that position to be evacuated. I am clearly of the opinion that to attempt at present to hold so advanced a position as Columbus, with the movable army under General Polk, where its communications can be so readily cut off by a superior force acting from the Tennessee River as a new base, would be to jeopardize, not only the safety of that army,
horn, or Pea Ridge. Beauregard in West Tennessee. evacuation of Columbus. Island no.10. Pope's expedition. Grant's expedition up the Tennessee. plan and movemention of Columbus, and the establishment of a new line resting on New Madrid, Island No.10, and Humboldt. Polk issued the preliminary orders February 25th, for the evcted Brigadier-General J. P. McCown, an old army-officer, for the command of Island No.10, forty miles below Columbus, whither he removed his division February 27th. Pittsburg Landing, important operations were occurring around New Madrid and Island No.10. On the 18th of February General Halleck sent Major-General John Pope, whom hope to hold this position until Fort Pillow was fortified. The defense at Island No.10 was not adequate to the preparations there; but, as its bearing on General Jn of his own army, 25,000 or 30,000 under Beauregard, and 9,000 or 10,000 at Island No.10, Fort Pillow, and other garrisons; not more than 60,000 in all, of whom not