Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Island Number Ten (Missouri, United States) or search for Island Number Ten (Missouri, United States) in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraph. (search)
clock P. M. Thursday the 13th. The thousands of Confederate prisoners of war who survive their confinement in camp Douglas near this city during the war, will remember this lady as one of the most active and efficient of those noble-hearted ladies who devoted themselves during the four long years of the existence of this noted prison-pen to the alleviation of their situation in providing for the sick, and clothing naked and destitute prisoners. The destitute prisoners of Fort Donelson—Island No.10—Arkansas Post, &c., &c., have cause to remember with gratitude her kind and efficient ministrations to their necessities at that time, and it has been a matter of surprise to those who knew of her work in behalf of the prisoners, that recognition of her services has not been recorded in your papers by some of those who were the beneficiaries of her labors, long, long ago. Yours truly, W. O. George. In the recent death of Ex-Governor John Letcher, at his residence in Lexington, Vir
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Incidents of prison life at camp Douglas—Experience of Corporal J. G. Blanchard. (search)
Incidents of prison life at camp Douglas—Experience of Corporal J. G. Blanchard. By Rev. William G. Keady. [The following interesting narrative is from the pen of a gallant soldier who lost an arm while serving in the trenches at Vicksburg, and whose empty sleeve tells as eloquently of his devotion to the Confederate cause as his voice now pleads the cause of the Prince of Peace]: Amongst the prisoners captured at Island No.10, and sent to Camp Douglas, Illinois, in April, 1862, was Corporal J. G. Blanchard, of the celebrated Pointe Coupee Battery, of Louisiana. Though then barely seventeen years of age, he had already been over a year in active service; and the restless activity, untiring energy, and unbounded enthusiasm characterizing his course from the time of his entry into service, bespoke unmistakably of how lively he would make matters if circumscribed for an indefinite term within the boundaries of a prison camp. When the news of the capture of his native city reach