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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The first fight of iron-clads. (search)
of the Cumberland. Her losses were terrible, and finally she ran up the white flag. As soon as we had hove in sight, coming down the harbor, the Roanoke, St. Lawrence, and Minnesota, assisted by tugs, had got under way, and started up from Old Point Comfort to join their consorts. They were under fire from the batteries at Sewell's Point, but the distance was too great to effect much. The first two, however, ran aground not far above Fort Monroe, and took Map of Hampton Roads and adjacent shores. but little part in the fight. The Minnesota, taking the middle or swash channel, steamed up half-way between Old Point Comfort and Newport News, when she grounded, but in a position to be actively engaged. Previous to this we had been joined by the James River squadron, which had been at anchor a few miles above, and came into action most gallantly, passing the shore batteries at Newport News under a heavy fire, and with some loss. It consisted of the Yorktown (or Patrick Hen
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., chapter 15.58 (search)
t up by the Confederates in the face of the broadsides of their ships, and it being only twelve miles from Fort Monroe (Old Point Comfort) it could have been reinforced to any extent. But they did give it up, and had hardly done so when they commen headed toward the Minnesota. But a most important incident had taken place during the night. The Monitor had reached Old Point about 10 o'clock; her commander had been informed of the events of the day, and ordered to proceed at once to the relieth her stem. Soon afterward they ceased firing and separated as if by common consent. The Monitor steamed away toward Old Point. Captain Van Brunt, commander of the Minnesota, states in his official report that when he saw the Monitor disappear, h for him, the Merrimac steamed slowly toward Norfolk, evidently disabled in her motive power. The Monitor, accompanied by several tugs, returned late in the afternoon, and they succeeded in floating off the Minnesota and conveying her to Old Point.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., In the monitor turret. (search)
nching nerve and undaunted courage he hurled his little untried vessel against his huge, well-proved antagonist, and won the battle. He was victor in the first ironclad battle of the world's history. The subsequent career of the Monitor needs but a few words. Commander Samuel Dana Greene, executive officer of the monitor. from a war-time photograph. On the day after the fight I received the following letter from Mr. Fox, Assistant Secretary of the Navy: U. S. Steamer Roanoke, Old Point, March 10th, 1862. my Dear Mr. Greene: Under the extraordinary circumstances of the contest of yesterday, and the responsibilities devolving upon me, and your extreme youth, I was twenty-two years of age, and previous to joining the Monitor had seen less than three years of active service, with the rank of midshipman.-S. D. G. I have suggested to Captain Marston to send on board the Monitor, as temporary commanding, Lieutenant Selfridge, until the arrival of Commodore Goldsborough, w