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the Second division detached. Railroad destroyed to Madison.--Weather: rainy.--Roads: Good but muddy.--Supplies: More plenty.--Distance: Seven miles. November 20. Order of march: Cavalry, Third and First divisions; Second division detached.--Weather: Cloudy; commenced raining at five P. M..--Road: Good but heavy.--Supplies: Not so plenty.--Distance : Twelve miles. November 21. Order of march: Cavalry, Third and First divisions; Second division detached. Pontoons laid across Little River.--Weather: Very rainy.--Road very muddy and worn. The condition of the road caused the Third brigade, First division, to encamp two miles to the rear.--Supplies : More plenty.--Distance: Thirteen miles. November 22. Order of march: Cavalry, First, Second, and Third divisions.--Weather: Cold, clear, but windy.--Road: Good.--Supplies: Plenty.--Distance: Fifteen miles. November 23. The troops remained in camp. November 24. Order of march: Cavalry, First, Second, and Third
November 21. Order of march: Cavalry, Third and First divisions; Second division detached. Pontoons laid across Little River.--Weather: Very rainy.--Road very muddy and worn. The condition of the road caused the Third brigade, First division, to encamp two miles to the rear.--Supplies : More plenty.--Distance: Thirteen miles.
half-past 7 A. M., and marched south from the railroad, on the west bank of the Oconee River. Encamped at five P. M., after having marched about fifteen (15) miles. Monday, November twenty-first, left our encampment at eight A. M., marching in a southerly direction; raining hard the greater part of the day. Halted for the night at five P. M.; marched about twelve (12) miles. Tuesday, November twenty-second, we left camp at forty-five minutes past six A. M., and about noon, crossed Little River on a pontoon-bridge. About half-past 4 P. M., came in sight of Milledgeville. After numerous halts, we at last entered the city, and passing through the city, crossed the Oconee River on a toll-bridge, and encamped about a mile from the river, going into camp at ten minutes past eight P. M., having marched about twenty miles. Wednesday, November twenty-third, remained in camp until two P. M., when we fell in and marched to the Gordon Railroad depot, and soon after commenced the destr
ion of our forces was as follows: In Louisiana, General Taylor had two divisions of infantry, and one thousand five hundred or two thousand cavalry in detachments. Walker's division, consisting of Randal's, Waul's, and Scurvey's brigades, was posted from Fort De Russy down Bayou De Glaize to Simmsport. Mouton's division, consisting of Polignac's and Grey's brigades, was divided--one brigade near Alexandria, and the other on its way to Alexandria: from Trinity (the junction of the Ouachita, Little, and Tensas Rivers) Banks was organizing his expedition at Berwick's Bay. Colonel Vincent, with the Second Louisiana cavalry and a battery, was near Opelousas, watching him. General Liddell, with a brigade of cavalry and several batteries, was near Monroe, watching the approaches from Natchez and Vicksburg. Green's cavalry, although ordered to move two weeks before this, did not leave the vicinity of Hempstead, Texas, till the fifteenth March, and did not reach General Taylor till between t