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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 224 2 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 172 2 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 153 117 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 152 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 136 14 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 132 12 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 86 4 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 1 80 2 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 78 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 78 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Pittsburg Landing (Tennessee, United States) or search for Pittsburg Landing (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

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9th of July. It was impossible at that time to travel on either of the direct routes, and he went to Bristol, Tennessee, where he was arrested and lodged in jail overnight, but released the next morning, after an examination by the military authorities. He then proceeded to Nashville, Tennessee, where a similar fate awaited him; but, after some difficulty, he also obtained his release there, and, proceeding direct to Louisville, met no further obstructions on his journey, via Cincinnati, Pittsburg, Harrisburg, and Lancaster, to Philadelphia. Among the causes which hastened his departure from Richmond was the general belief there that every citizen capable of bearing arms would soon be impressed into the military service, and the alternative was presented to him of soon being subjected to great indignities, bearing arms against the North, or escaping. Some of the intelligence he communicated to us was of a very important character, and it was all full of interest. He informed