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Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 4 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 2 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 2 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 19, 1865., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 1 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Index (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for Plum Point (Tennessee, United States) or search for Plum Point (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 17: evacuation of Fort Pillow and battle of Memphis. (search)
ater and subjected to a murderous fire from the guns of the victorious Merrimac. At Hampton Roads the cry was Death to the Federals! At Memphis it was Help for the drowning Confederates! The battle had carried most of the Union vessels ten miles below Memphis, and they now found themselves to have been successful beyond all hopes. The enemy was completely swept away, as if his vessels had been made of paper — a result which our officers had hardly expected since the gallant action at Plum Point, in which these same vessels, under Montgomery, proved such formidable foes. Rear-Admiral Davis had no military authority over the ram fleet. He could only request co-operation, which the Commander, Col. Ellet, was eager to give. The latter fought well, but unfortunately his vessels did not keep together and therefore did not accomplish as much as they would have done by a combined attack. Three of the rams did not get into action until after the Queen of the West and Monarch had mad