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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Closing operations in the Gulf and western rivers. (search)
boat Sciota was lost in the same way, as were also the tugs Ida and Althea, and a launch belonging to the Cincinnati. These disasters resulted in a loss of 23 killed and 32 wounded. In the Mississippi squadron, now under the command of Acting Rear-Admiral S. P. Lee, the last months were chiefly occupied in convoy duty and keeping up communication on the Mississippi, in blockading the Red River, and in active operations in conjunction with the army by the fleets on the Tennessee and Cumberland rivers, the former under Lieutenant-Commander Shirk and the latter under Lieutenant-Commander Fitch. Both these officers displayed great energy and resource in an exacting and difficult service, and they were ably seconded by the volunteer officers who commanded the light gun-boats in frequent and hotly contested engagements with the Confederate batteries and troops on the banks. The last effort of the Confederate navy on the Western rivers was the brilliant but unsuccessful dash of the r
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Cavalry operations in the West under Rosecrans and Sherman. (search)
albraith all reached Huntsville, Alabama, and, after capturing prisoners, supplies, and stock, returned without serious loss. The Confederates on their part also made a celebrated raid at this time. On the 27th of June Morgan crossed the Cumberland River at Burksville, Kentucky, with about 2500 men. He passed northwardly through Columbia, Kentucky, and, reaching Green River at Tebbs's Bend on the 4th of July, demanded the surrender of Colonel O. H. Moore, who was stationed there with a portiol. III., p. 635.] This raid has become famous for many reasons, but one of the most notable things pertaining to it was the pursuit and capture of the raider and his men. The pursuit began at Burksville immediately upon Morgan's passage of Cumberland River. The night of the passage four Kentucky cavalry regiments, the 1st, 8th, 9th, and 12th, under Generals J. M. Shackelford and E. H. Hobson, both Kentuckians, were concentrated at Marrow Bone, only a few miles west of Burksville. Four noted
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 9.64 (search)
eenforce it, if possible, by accessions from Tennessee. I was imbued with the belief that I could accomplish this feat, afterward march north-east, pass the Cumberland River at some crossing where the gun-boats, if too formidable at other points, were unable to interfere, then move into Kentucky, and take position with our left a, I obtained through spies. I knew equally well that in the absence of the prestige of complete victory I could not venture with my small force to cross the Cumberland River into Kentucky, without first receiving reenforcements from the Trans-Mississippi Department. I felt convinced that the Tennesseans and Kentuckians would notnd destruction of three block houses on the Chattanooga Railroad by Bate's division; and of the seizure the day previous by Chalmers of two transports on the Cumberland River with 300 mules on board. We had in our possession two engines and several cars, which ran as far south as Pulaski. Dispatches were sent to Generals Beaur