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Fort Negley, and commanding the approaches to the city by the Granny White, Franklin and Nolensville turnpikes. Brigadier-General J. F. Miller reported his command to me at four o'clock A. M., and occupied the works from Fort Negley to the Lebanon pike, commanding the approaches to the city by the Murfreesboro, Chicken and Lebanon turnpikes. Brigadier-General J. L. Donelson reported his command at six o'clock, and occupied the works from the right of General Cruft's command to the Cumberland river, commanding the approaches to the city by the Harding and Hillsboroa turnpikes. Having thus disposed the troops as directed, for the protection of the city, fully commanding all its approaches, and rendering the public property and supplies secure against sudden attack from either flank, I moved out at half-past 6 o'clock A. M., in obedience to the orders of Major-General Thomas, with the Twelfth, Thirteenth and One Hundredth regiments of colored troops, under the command of Colonel
Fort Negley, and commanding the approaches to the city by the Granny White, Franklin and Nolensville turnpikes. Brigadier-General J. F. Miller reported his command to me at four o'clock A. M., and occupied the works from Fort Negley to the Lebanon pike, commanding the approaches to the city by the Murfreesboro, Chicken and Lebanon turnpikes. Brigadier-General J. L. Donelson reported his command at six o'clock, and occupied the works from the right of General Cruft's command to the Cumberland river, commanding the approaches to the city by the Harding and Hillsboroa turnpikes. Having thus disposed the troops as directed, for the protection of the city, fully commanding all its approaches, and rendering the public property and supplies secure against sudden attack from either flank, I moved out at half-past 6 o'clock A. M., in obedience to the orders of Major-General Thomas, with the Twelfth, Thirteenth and One Hundredth regiments of colored troops, under the command of Colonel
nemy on the second of October, about three miles and a half from Saltville, and drove him into his strongly-intrenched position around the salt works, from which he was unable to dislodge him. During the night he withdrew his command, and returned to Kentucky. General Sherman, immediately after the fall of Atlanta, put his armies in camp in and about the place, and made all preparations for refitting and supplying them for future service. The great length of road from Atlanta to the Cumberland river, however, which had to be guarded, allowed the troops but little rest. During this time Jefferson Davis made a speech in Macon, Georgia, which was reported in the papers of the South, and soon became known to the whole country, disclosing the plans of the enemy, thus enabling General Sherman to fully meet them. He exhibited the weakness of supposing that an army that had been beaten and fearfully decimated in a vain attempt at the defensive, could successfully undertake the offensiv
eneral A. J. Smith's command occupying the right, his right resting on the Cumberland river, below the city; the Fourth corps (Brigadier-General Wood temporarily in coro, the enemy's cavalry moved northward to Lebanon and along the bank of the Cumberland in that vicinity, threatening to cross to the north side of the river and intline in rear of his present position, stretching from the Reservoir on the Cumberland river to Fort Negley, with a strong skirmish line, and mass the remainder of hisn's) was sent at the same time to look after a battery of the enemy on the Cumberland river, at Bell's Landing, eight miles below Nashville. General Johnson did not r, by making a wide detour, via Elizabethtown and Glasgow, in reaching the Cumberland river, and crossing at Burkville, from where General Lyon proceeded, via McMinnvtfully, Your obedient servant, A. Mordecai, Capt. Ord., Chief Ord. Dep't, Cumberland. Major-General G. H. Thomas, U. S. A., Commanding Department Cumberland, East