hide Matching Documents

Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for Potomac River (United States) or search for Potomac River (United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 4 document sections:

Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 3: closing of Southern ports.--increase of the Navy.--list of vessels and their stations.--purchased vessels.--vessels constructing, etc. (search)
rom the very outbreak of the civil war. In a very brief period the rebellion assumed such formidable proportions, and naval operations had to be maintained on such an extensive scale to include over three thousand miles of coast line, that the energy and ability of the naval authorities were put to the severest tests. First. There was the closing of all the ports along our Southern coast under the most exacting regulations of an international blockade, including the occupation of the Potomac River from its mouth to the Federal Capitol. Had the Potomac been blocked by the enemy's guns at any time during the war, it would have rendered the position of our armies in Virginia and around the Capitol very embarrassing. Second. The necessity of establishing an effective organization of combined naval and military expeditions against various points on our Southern coast, including also all needful naval aid to the Army in cutting off communication with the rebels. Besides this it
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 4: death of Ellsworth.--capture of Alexandria, Va.--Potomac flotilla. (search)
there seemed to have been an indisposition on its part at that moment to take any hostile action; and amidst the daily increasing confusion of affairs which startled the Nation, even the Navy Department did not exhibit an unusual activity. The Potomac flotilla was chiefly engaged in moving up and down the river, gaining information of the enemy's movements, convoying transports to and from Washington, often fired upon, and only able to return the fire without much effect, and with no power realize the Secessionists were animated with a fell purpose which would not be appeased until the whole land was saturated with blood and sorrow walked over the battle-fields where friends and foes lay mingled together in the arms of death. The Potomac naturally became the first theatre of war as regards the Navy, for the Department at that moment had no ships with which to operate elsewhere, and some small affairs which took place on the river rose to importance from the fact that there was
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 22: operations in the Potomac.--destruction of Confederate batteries.--losses by shipwreck, in battle, etc. (search)
Chapter 22: operations in the Potomac.--destruction of Confederate batteries.--losses by shipwreck, in battle, etc. The Potomac flotilla. naval operations in the Potomac. destruction of Confederate batteries. Confederate rams. condition of the Navy, and list of vessels in December, 1862. losses by shipwreck, in battle, etc., etc. On the Potomac, the flotilla seems to have been actively employed from December, 1861, to May 2d, 1862. Although no important event occurred on vessels were frequently attacked by field-pieces and riflemen, but they always managed to give a good account of themselves, while they demoralized the enemy by their persistent pursuit of him — but these adventures were not very exciting. The Potomac may be said to have been opened with the fall of the forts at Cockpit Point, for though the flotilla was maintained, and there were skirmishes with the enemy from time to time, there was nothing to hinder the passage of vessels up and down the
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 58: conclusion. (search)
t year of the war was one of wonderful development for the Navy, not only in establishing a complete blockade, but in the usefulness of naval vessels in assisting the Army to carry out plans of conquest that it could never have achieved alone. In a very short time after the Confederacy was established, all the great rivers of the West and their tributaries were in Confederate hands, and the most inaccessible points therein armed with ponderous guns, manned by an excited soldiery. The Potomac River was blockaded almost from Alexandria to the Chesapeake; the Sounds of North Carolina were filled with powerful batteries, and the channels closed by sunken obstructions. Every port on the Southern coast was protected by well-constructed forts, and closed against the few vessels the Government owned, and for a time the Federal cause looked so hopeless that Europeon despots might well be excused for supposing that it would be an impossible task to recover the lost domain, unprovided as th