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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 52 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Atlantic Essays 34 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 24 0 Browse Search
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown 24 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 24 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 14 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition. 14 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 12 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2 10 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition.. You can also browse the collection for Puritan (Ohio, United States) or search for Puritan (Ohio, United States) in all documents.

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. Yet there had been Puritans in the colony almost from the beginning: even the Brownists were freely offered a secure asylum; Bradford, in Prince. here, said the tolerant Whitaker, neither surplice nor subscription is spoken of, and several Puritan families, and perhaps I muse that so fewof our English ministers, that were so hot against the surplice and subscription, come hither, where neither is spoken of. Whitaker, in Purchas, b. IX. c. XI. some even of the Puritan clergy, emigrated ith their reception, that large numbers were preparing to follow, and were restrained 1619. only by the forethought of English intolerance. We have seen, that the Pilgrims at Plymouth were invited to remove within the jurisdiction of Virginia; Puritan 1629. merchants planted themselves on the James River without fear, and emigrants from Massachusetts had 1640. recently established themselves in the colony. The honor of Laud had been vindicated by a judicial sentence, and south of the Potom
ce. For a season, there was a divided rule; Fendall was acknowledged by the 1658 Catholic party in the city of St. Mary's; and the commissioners were sustained by the Puritans of St. Leonard's. At length, the conditions of a compromise were settled; and the government of the whole prov- Mar. 24. ince was surrendered to the agent of the proprietary. Permission to retain arms; an indemnity for arrears; relief from the oath of fealty; and a confirmation of the acts and orders of the recent Puritan assemblies;— these were the terms of the surrender, and prove the influence of the Puritans. Bacon's Preface, and 1658, c. i. McMahon, 211, and Council Proceedings, in McMahon, note to 14 Fendall was a weak and impetuous man; but I cannot find any evidence that his administration was stained by injustice. Most of the statutes enacted during his government were thought worthy of being perpetuated. The death of Cromwell left the condition of England uncertain, and might well diffuse
imes was a guaranty, that the immense majority of emigrants would be fugitives who scrupled compliance with the common prayer. The prelatical party had no motive to emigrate; it was Puritanism, almost alone, that would pass over; and freedom of Puritan worship was necessarily the purpose and the result of the colony. The proceedings of the company, moreover, did not fall under the immediate supervision of the king, and did not require his assent to render them valid; so that self-direction iniliating peace; an able legislator; dear to the people by his benevolent virtues and his disinterested conduct. Then also came the most revered spiritual teachers of two commonwealths—the acute and subtile Cotton, the son of a Chap. IX.} 1633 Puritan lawyer; eminent at Cambridge as a scholar; quick in the nice perception of distinctions, and pliant in dialectics; in manner persuasive rather than commanding; skilled in the fathers and the schoolmen, but finding all their wisdom compactly stor
country had been guiltless of blood; and causes were already in action which were fast substituting the firmness and the charity of intelligence for the severity of religious 1642. bigotry. It was ever the custom, and it soon became the law, in Puritan New England, that none of the brethren shall suffer so much barbarism in their families, as not to teach their children and apprentices so much learning as may enable them perfectly to read the English tongue. To the end that learning may not bDark crimes, that seemed without a motive, may have been pursued under that name; I find one record of a trial for witch craft, where the prisoner was proved a murderess. Records, II. 54, 55. On every subject but religion, the mildness of Puritan legislation corresponded to the popular character of Puritan doctrines. Hardly a nation of Europe has as yet made its criminal law so humane as that of early New England. A crowd of offences was at one sweep brushed from the catalogue of capit