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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for Quoddy (Maine, United States) or search for Quoddy (Maine, United States) in all documents.

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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 1: Ancestry.—1764-1805. (search)
and it is questionable, when he deserted her, if he meant the separation to be final. Romantic love had a romantic beginning. By some chance of coast navigation Abijah found himself on Deer Island, N. B., in Passamaquoddy Bay (waters called Quoddy, for short). Here, at a religious evening meeting, his eye fell upon a strikingly beautiful young woman, dressed in a blue habit; or, more than likely, the previous sight of her was the cause of that evening's piety. At the close of the services to have improved his time so well on the voyage that, young as they both were, he married Mary Lawless on March 30, 1771, the day after they had landed on the island of Campobello. Andrew became a so-called branch (i.e., commissioned) pilot, at Quoddy, and died suddenly in the service in the year 1813. His wife, whom he survived, though not long, was reputed the first person buried on Deer Island; and on this unfertile but picturesque and fascinating spot Fanny Lloyd was born in 1776, and bec
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 2: Boyhood.—1805-1818. (search)
of the vessels sailing from those ports in 1805-1808. Yet he always bore that title. in which capacity he made several voyages. The only record that remains of these is contained in two letters, written respectively to his brother Joseph, then residing at Deer Island, and to his wife. The first, which bears date of April 3, 1806 (from Newburyport), mentions that he has just returned from Virginia with a load of Corn and Flour, that he has declined numerous opportunities to go as pilot to Quoddy on good wages, not being aware that his brother was there, and believing that he could make more by going to Virginia; and that he has some thought of going on a fishing trip to Labrador, thirty dollars a month being the inducement. Evidently he was well satisfied with his experience in Massachusetts, for he had already written to his brother William that he liked the country in the main, though giving some ludicrous descriptions of the customs of the place. And he now wrote to Joseph: