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Cambridge sketches (ed. Estelle M. H. Merrill) 30 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Cambridge sketches (ed. Estelle M. H. Merrill). You can also browse the collection for Radcliffe (Kentucky, United States) or search for Radcliffe (Kentucky, United States) in all documents.

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Cambridge sketches (ed. Estelle M. H. Merrill), A chapter of Radcliffe College. (search)
able to obtain the advantages which come from the endowments and long traditions of the college for men. No endowment-fund could compensate for the loss of this. There can never be question of the character of scholarship of the professors at Radcliffe, because they are the professors of Harvard whom no enticements of high salary or great opportunity can tempt away. Zzzn omen have them assured at Radcliffe. Another advantage which the students of Radcliffe have enjoyed always is found in Radcliffe. Another advantage which the students of Radcliffe have enjoyed always is found in the fact that the seven ladies who interested themselves in the work when it began, have continued to use their influence for the students, and have done for them not only what was promised in the original circular, but a great deal more. They have been the friends of the young women, their counsellors and guides, have assisted them upon their social occasions of all sorts, and have surrounded them with an atmosphere of refinement and cultivation which could not have come to them through the a
Cambridge sketches (ed. Estelle M. H. Merrill), Life at Radcliffe. (search)
Life at Radcliffe. Martha Trimble Bennett. Life at Radcliffe does not lend itself easily to description.Radcliffe does not lend itself easily to description. There are few picturesque details which can be seized upon,--no float day as at Wellesley, no ivy and tree plred over Cambridge in twos and threes, and life at Radcliffe is so largely a matter of the individual that it i college, can have but little idea of what life at Radcliffe means to the student who comes from a distance andtelligent-oil-can atmosphere which the stranger at Radcliffe finds in her college life. and it is at once depras and theatres, and to be present at almost every Radcliffe festivity during the year. As may be guessed from this, a life at Radcliffe does not mean all work and no play for even the hardest workers. It is a signific One of the most delightful features of life at Radcliffe is the opportunity afforded the students for meeti constantly growing feeling that they will be better and wiser women for their four years life at Radcliffe.
Cambridge sketches (ed. Estelle M. H. Merrill), Student life at Radcliffe. (search)
Student life at Radcliffe. Sarah Yerxa. When we pause, for a moment, as now, to consider life at Radcliffe, we cannot but ask ourselves how it differs from life at other colleges whose purpose is the same, to give young women opportunity to fRadcliffe, we cannot but ask ourselves how it differs from life at other colleges whose purpose is the same, to give young women opportunity to fit themselves for larger and richer spheres of usefulness than they otherwise could fill adequately. To me, Radcliffe life seems to have had as its essential quality, freedom. This freedom is given in both work and play. The wealth of material nts through four years of college life are best able to judge. Since, at the present time, we have no dormitories at Radcliffe, the distinctively college life of the Radcliffe students centres around old Fay House, rich for many with associations of ourselves. And the topic we were discussing was, --whether or no crinolines would be worn the coming season! At Radcliffe, though many are sceptical in regard to our social life, even now, we are-able to do everything together save eating an