hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 110 0 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 66 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 64 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 60 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 56 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 52 0 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 52 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 50 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 34 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 32 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Red River (Texas, United States) or search for Red River (Texas, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 9 results in 5 document sections:

ith General Schofield's troops against Little, Rock, and another under Generals Ord and Herron to New-Orleans, to reenforce General Banks for such ulterior operations as he might deem proper to undertake. Some expeditions were also sent to the Red River, and to Harrisonburgh and Monroe, on the Washita, to break up and destroy guerrilla bands. After General Grant left Vicksburgh to assume the general command east of the Mississippi, General McPherson moved with a part of his force to Canton, Mck, and while our cavalry were driving the main force of rebels south, the enemy attempted the recapture of Pine Bluff, but was repulsed with heavy loss. On the twenty-eighth of October, our troops occupied Arkadelphia, the enemy retreating to Red River. A large part of the military force in the Department of the Missouri has been employed during the past year in repelling raids, and in repressing the guerrilla bands of robbers and murderers who have come within our lines, or been organized
Doc. 101.-expedition up the Black and Washita Rivers. Report of rear-admiral D. D. Porter. flag-ship Black Hawk, Mississippi Squadron, Red River, March 6, 1864. sir: I have the honor to report that I sent an expedition up the Black and Washita Rivers on the first instant, under command of Lieutenant Commander F. M. Raere on the Fort Hindman at half-past 1 P. M. on the twenty-ninth ultimo, taking the Osage, Cricket, Ouachita, Lexington, and Conestoga with me, and proceeding up Red River, anchored at dark about fifteen miles from the mouth of Black River. At daylight on the first instant, I got under way and proceeded up Black River. At four P. fight while we are up here. They may attempt to annoy us with musketry, but are too much demoralized to make another stand, and, between here and the mouth of the Red, there is no place so favorable for them to give battle in, as this. Their losses in yesterday's battle must have been very severe. The guns in this fleet equal t
was struck twice out of four shots to-day in the first reconnoissance, but no one hurt. One shot struck within two feet of the boilers, without doing any damage. I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, E. K. Owen, Lieutenant Commander, commanding Fifth District. Rear-Admiral D. D. Porter, Commanding Mississippi Squadron. Letter from rear-admiral Porter, transmitting additional report of Lieutenant Commander E. K. Owen. flag-ship Black Hawk, Mississippi Squadron, Red River, March 6, 1864. sir: I have the honor to inclose herewith copy of report from Lieutenant Commander E. K. Owen, in relation to movements up the Yazoo River. I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, David D. Porter, Rear-Admiral. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. Additional report of Lieutenant E. K. Owen. United States steamer Marmora, off Greenwood, Miss., February 15, 1864. sir: I have the honor to report the arrival of the expedit
ack, and met the infantry resting three miles from the river, who returned with them to the boat. On the way there, the advance-guard (cavalry) came upon a reb, who tried to escape them; they gave chase, and Jonny reb was thrown from his critter, and then surrendered. Upon being asked by Captain Garrison as to his occupation, he stated that he was a despatch-bearer for the C. S. A., and drew forth a batch of despatches, among which were some announcing a victory of the rebs over Banks on Red River. The troops arrived at Augusta without further molestation. The next two days scouts were sent out, bringing in a great number of mules, horses, and contrabands, and at daylight of the twenty-fourth they left Augusta, and arrived here at two o'clock P. M. Accompanying the infantry was Lieutenant Albert Potthoff, Post Quartermaster at Little Rock, who is greatly pleased with his lot of horses and mules. Officers and men behaved gallantly. The enemy's loss is not known, but is believe
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore), Passage of the falls by the fleet. (search)
Passage of the falls by the fleet. Report of rear-admiral D. D. Porter. flag-ship Black Hawk, Mississippi Squadron, mouth of Red River, May 16, 1864. sir: I have the honor to inform you that the vessels lately caught by low water above the falls at Alexandria have been released from their unpleasant position. The water had fallen so low that I had no hope or expectation of getting the vessels out this season, and as the army had made arrangements to evacuate the country, I saw not the tugs. By three o'clock that afternoon the vessels were all coaled, ammunition replaced, and all steamed down the river, with the convoy of transports in company. A good deal of difficulty was anticipated in getting over the bars in lower Red River; depth of water reported only five feet; gunboats were drawing six. Providentially, we had a rise from the back-water of the Mississippi, that river being very high at that time; the back-water extending to Alexandria, one hundred and fifty mi