Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Rich Mountain (West Virginia, United States) or search for Rich Mountain (West Virginia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.5 (search)
e 27th of May, 1861, it was mustered into service. This roll contains not only those mustered in there, but the others who were mustered in afterwards. After drilling for some weeks, it was ordered to reinforce General Garnett in West Virginia, and with the Pittsylvania Cavalry, went to Staunton on the railroad from Ashland, and then marched to Monterey and Cheat Mountain, arriving at Laurel Hill July 6, 1861. General Garnett was forced to retreat by General McClellan, who had taken Rich Mountain, on his flank. Our army retreated by Carrock's ford, and participated in that battle, where Garnett was killed. It went then to Moorefield, in July, 1861. At Franklin, West Virginia, the company spent the winter of 1861 and 1862. While at Franklin, a new Captain and Second and Third Lieutenants were elected, the First having resigned. It guarded the right flank of our army in that section, and was in several skirmishes. The services of the men and non-commissioned officers were ard
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.28 (search)
D, 44th Virginia Infantry, Colonel W. C. Scott, of Powhatan county, for publication in your Confederate column. I think it will be of interest at least to the surviving members of the regiment. This company was mustered into the service of the Confederate States on the 9th of June, 1861, as from Louisa. The men, in fact, were about in equal numbers from Louisa, Goochland, Hanover and Fluvanna. After drilling at Camp Lee a few weeks, it was ordered to reinforce General Garnett at Rich Mountain, W. Va. It arrived just in time to witness his defeat and death. It then fell back to a strong position, where the Staunton and Parkersburg turnpike crosses the Greenbrier river. Colonel Edward Johnson, of the 12th Georgia, and others, under command of General Henry R. Jackson, arrived and fortified this position. The Federals, under General Reynolds, advanced and fortified on Cheat mountain, about nine miles distant. The two armies remained inactive until the 3d of October, when the Feder