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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 46 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 38 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 36 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 34 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 28 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 24 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, A book of American explorers 20 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 14 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 14 0 Browse Search
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 14 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for Roanoke (United States) or search for Roanoke (United States) in all documents.

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James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The most famous naval action of the Civil war (search)
was heard the sound of heavy firing, and Lieutenant John L. Worden, then in command, as he listened intently, estimated the distance to be full twenty miles and correctly guessed that it was the Merrimac in conflict with the Federal fleet. While she steamed ahead the Monitor was made ready for action, although such preparations were of the simplest character. Before long the flames and smoke from the burning Congress could be easily distinguished. At 9 P. M. the Monitor was alongside the Roanoke, whose commander, Captain Marston, suggested that she should go at once to the assistance of the Minnesota, which was still aground. It was midnight before Lieutenant S. Dana Greene, sent by Worden, reached the Minnesota and reported to Captain Van Brunt. While the two officers were talking there came a succession of loud reports, and the Congress blew up, as if warning her sisters of the fleet of the fate in store for them. There was little sleep for anyone that night. At seven o'clo
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The most daring feat — passing the forts at New Orleans (search)
most sank her. A few minutes later the ugly shape of the turtle-back ram Manassas appeared almost under the Brooklyn's bows. Had she not changed her course a little all would have been over, but the blow glanced from the chain armor slung along her sides. In The Miami From the time she ran the forts below New Orleans with Farragut, the Miami was ever on the go. During 1863-4, under the redoubtable Lieutenant-Commander C. W. Flusser, she was active in Carolina waters. In the Roanoke River, April 1, 1864, she met her most thrilling adventure when she and the Southfield were attacked by the powerful Confederate ram Albemarle. The Southfield was sunk, but the Miami in a plucky running fight made her escape down the river and gave the alarm. After a shooting-trip ashore — officers on the deck of the Miami An indefatigable gunboat — the Miami eagerness to see what damage had been inflicted, a man crawled out of a hatch on the sloping topsides of the ram while she wa
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Naval actions along the shore (search)
Captain Lynch, C. S. N., upon that occasion, making prisoners of nearly all her officers and crew. On July 9, 1862, she led two other frail gunboats up the Roanoke River on a reconnaissance. Commander Flusser's orders were to go to Hamilton; and despite the fact that the river banks were lined with sharpshooters, he braved the64, the indomitable Lieutenant W. B. Cushing, who had been constantly proposing wonderful and almost impossible things, succeeded in getting eight miles up the Roanoke River in North Carolina and sinking, in an open launch, with a torpedo, the Confederate ram Albemarle. The gunboat Otsego ran afoul of a torpedo in the Roanoke RiRoanoke River on December 9th and went to the bottom, and after the fall of the last fort, Fort Fisher, the Patapsco was sunk in Charleston Harbor, January 15, 1865, and officers and crew were lost to the number of sixty. Still later in the war, in April, the monitors Milwaukee and Osage suffered a like fate. They were in Admiral Thatcher'
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Naval chronology 1861-1865: important naval engagements of the Civil war March, 1861-June, 1865 (search)
. October, 1864. October 7, 1864. Confed. cruiser Florida captured at Bahia, Bay of San Salvador, Brazil, by U. S. S. Wachusett, Commander Collins. October 27, 1864. The Confed. ram Albemarle sunk by Lieut. Cushing, in the Roanoke River. October 31, 1864. Capture of Confed. batteries and their ordnance and ordnance stores, at Plymouth, N. C. November, 1864. November 11, 1864. U. S. S. Tulip destroyed by boiler explosion off Ragged Point, Va. 49 officers and men killed (all of crew but 10). December, 1864. December 9, 1864. The gunboat Otsego sunk by a Confed. torpedo in the Roanoke River. December 22, 1864. Loss of the U. S. transport North American by foundering at sea. 194 lives lost. December 24, 1864. Furious attack on Fort Fisher, N. C., by the fleet of Adml. Porter. December 25, 1864. Attack on Fort Fisher renewed. Three brigades of Union infantry landed two and a half miles above the fort. They were