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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 4 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 2 0 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.1, Texas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 5, 1863., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for Sabine Lake (Michigan, United States) or search for Sabine Lake (Michigan, United States) in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 42: Red River expedition.--continued. (search)
his last happened to be the condition when Banks' expedition started, which is why the Admiral strongly objected to going up the river at that time. Any one who studies the map of Louisiana can estimate the value of General Halleck's judgment in favoring such a scheme. He wanted a point in Texas to hold permanently. With the aid of gun-boats 40,000 men could have been landed near Sabine Pass, and all that was worth anything in Texas would have been at the disposal of Federal forces. Sabine Lake was there to shelter any number of light-draft transports, with quick transportation and naval protection. Instead of this, two armies were started 500 miles apart, with no chance of communicating on the way, to march through vast swamps and woods, across numerous rivers and streams, and over very difficult roads. General Grant saw the folly of this scheme and disapproved the attempt; but, even although he had taken Vicksburg, he did not feel strong enough to oppose so powerful a poli