Browsing named entities in Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army .. You can also browse the collection for Sailor's Creek (Virginia, United States) or search for Sailor's Creek (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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Lee an Intercepted despatch at Amelia Court House battle of Sailor's Creek the Confederates' stubborn resistance a complete victory imp parallel to the enemy's line of march. Just after crossing Sailor's Creek, a favorable opportunity offering, both Merritt and Crook attacstreet in his front and Gordon in his rear led to the battle of Sailor's Creek, one of the severest conflicts of the war, for the enemy foughton road, facing them north toward and some little distance from Sailor's Creek, supporting Kershaw with Commander Tucker's Marine brigade. Ewell's skirmishers held the line of Sailor's Creek, which runs through a gentle valley, the north slope of which was cleared ground. By Genour's left. Both divisions thus aligned faced southwest toward Sailor's Creek, and the artillery of the corps being massed to the left and frase of the matter, when informed of what had Battle-field of Sailor's Creek: about 5 P. M. April 6th 1875. taken place, by requiring Wrigh
Chapter VIII Lincoln's laconic despatch capturing Lee's supplies delighted Engineers the Confederates' last effort a flag of truce General Geary's last ditch absurdity meeting of Grant and Lee the surrender estimate of General Grant. The first report of the battle of Sailor's Creek that General Grant received was, as already stated, an oral message carried by Colonel Price, of my staff. Near midnight I sent a despatch giving the names of the generals captured. These were Ewell, Kershaw, Barton, Corse, Dubose, and Custis Lee. In the same despatch I wrote: If the thing is pressed, I think that Lee will surrender. When Mr. Lincoln, at City Point, received this word from General Grant, who was transmitting every item of news to the President, he telegraphed Grant the laconic message: Let the thing be pressed. The morning of the 7th we moved out at a very early hour, Crook's division marching toward Farmville in direct pursuit, while Merritt and Mackenzie were ord