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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 11, 1863., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Siegel (Minnesota, United States) or search for Siegel (Minnesota, United States) in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
try to relieve the pressure on Lee by a rapid advance to the Potomac and demonstrations against Washington and Baltimore. Leaving Salem on June 24, Early marched rapidly to the Potomac, a distance of 212 miles, by July 4th, driving Sigel's forces from Martinsburg and other points, to take refuge on the Maryland Heights. Mr. Pond praises Sigel for remaining there with 6,000 or 8,000 men when he should have joined Wallace's troops advancing from Baltimore. Early finding he could not get at Siegel, marched round him, and on July 9th, entered Frederick; on the same day he attacked Wallace, who, with some garrison troops and Rickett's division, of the Sixth corps, which Grant had sent up, was holding the line of the Monocacy. Wallace had about 6,000 men. He was completely defeated and driven in rout towards Baltimore, with the loss of one-third of his command. Early now continued to press forward by forced marches and in spite of heat and dust arrived before the defences of Washingt
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Shenandoah Valley in 1864, by George E. Pond—Campaigns of the civil war, XI. (search)
try to relieve the pressure on Lee by a rapid advance to the Potomac and demonstrations against Washington and Baltimore. Leaving Salem on June 24, Early marched rapidly to the Potomac, a distance of 212 miles, by July 4th, driving Sigel's forces from Martinsburg and other points, to take refuge on the Maryland Heights. Mr. Pond praises Sigel for remaining there with 6,000 or 8,000 men when he should have joined Wallace's troops advancing from Baltimore. Early finding he could not get at Siegel, marched round him, and on July 9th, entered Frederick; on the same day he attacked Wallace, who, with some garrison troops and Rickett's division, of the Sixth corps, which Grant had sent up, was holding the line of the Monocacy. Wallace had about 6,000 men. He was completely defeated and driven in rout towards Baltimore, with the loss of one-third of his command. Early now continued to press forward by forced marches and in spite of heat and dust arrived before the defences of Washingt